?

Log in

No account? Create an account

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

Tags:

Tuesday reading

Current
Cloud and Ashes, by Greer Gilman
The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russell
David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens
Seven Pillars of Wisdom, by T.E. Lawrence

Last books finished
Paper Girls Volume 6, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang

Next books
Be My Enemy, by Ian McDonald
The Bastard of Istanbul, by Eilif Shafak

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

September books

Non-fiction: 6 (YTD 41)
Setting the Truth Free: The Inside Story of the Bloody Sunday Campaign, by Julieann Campbell
De Bourgondiërs, by Bart Van Loo
Anthropological Studies of Religion: An Introductory Text, by Brian Morris
The Writing Life, by Annie Dillard
Cycling in Victorian Ireland, by Brian Griffin
In Ethiopia with a Mule, by Dervla Murphy



Fiction (non-sf): 4 (YTD 25)
Pigs in Heaven, by Barbara Kingsolver
Make Out With Murder, by Lawrence Block
The Topless Tulip Caper, by Lawrence Block
How To Be Both, by Ali Smith



sf (non-Who): 2 (YTD 63)
The Devil in Amber, by Mark Gatiss
A Local Habitation, by Seanan McGuire



Doctor Who, etc: 5 (YTD 25)
Resurrection of the Daleks, by Eric Saward
Resurrection of the Daleks, by Paul Scoones
Doctor Who: 365 Days of Memorable Moments and Impossible Things, by Justin Richards
In Time, ed. Xanna Eve Chown
Lethbridge-Stewart: The Havoc Files, ed. Shaun Russell



Comics 6 (YTD 25)
Paper Girls Volume 1, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 2, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 3, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 4, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 5, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 6, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang



5,000 pages (YTD 49,000)
7/23 (YTD 72/180) by non-male writers (Campbell, Dillard, Murphy, Kingsolver, Smith, McGuire, Chown)
6/23 (YTD 29/180) by PoC (Chiang x5)
5/23 (YTD 23/180) rereads (The Topless Tulip Caper, Resurrection of the Daleks (Scoones), Paper Girls 1, 3 and 4)

Reading now
Cloud and Ashes, by Greer Gilman
The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russell
David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens
Seven Pillars of Wisdom, by T.E. Lawrence

Coming soon (perhaps):
Be My Enemy, by Ian McDonald
The Bastard of Istanbul, by Eilif Shafak
Frédégonde, la sanguinaire, Tome 1, by Virginie Greiner
Luck and the Irish, by Roy Foster
Normal People, by Sally Rooney
The Computer Connection, by Alfred Bester
Two Brothers, by Ben Elton
The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
A Close Run Thing, by Allan Mallinson
"Catch That Zeppelin!", by Fritz Leiber
Being Human: Bad Blood, by James Goss
One of the 28th: A tale of Waterloo, by G. A. Henty
The Last Days of New Paris, by China Miéville
My Century, by Günther Grass
The Invisible Man, by H.G. Wells
Dragon’s Claw, by Steve Moore
Being Human: Bad Blood, by James Goss
Black Wine, by Candas Jane Dorsey
Sybil, by Benjamin Disraeli
The Three Musketeers, by Alexandre Dumas

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

My top tweets, 2019 Q3

At the end of June I listed my top tweets of the year so far, mainly out of general interest but partly to see how I could maintain my position in the list of Top 40 EUInfluencers, which I scraped into in 2017 and 2018 (in 37th and 39th place). In fact I didn't make it this year, but I think some reflection one what's been successful and what hasn't in the last three months' tweeting. This time I've taken the Twitter analytics and looked at the top tweet in each category, ranked here by aggregate rank in all categories. That gave me the following top ten tweets from the last three months. Six of them are about Brexit, three are about sf and one is just an article which I found interesting and thought worth sharing.

Because I am not confident in Livejournal's abilty to embed tweets, I am embedding screenshots as well; apologies for double emploi.

10) This (from just the other day), a response to the writer Robert Harris had the highest engagement rate at just over 27%. I guess "engagement rate" is engagements (those who click on it) divided by impressions (those who see it in their stream). Replying to someone with a lot of followers (Harris has 71,000) will probably increase the rate of engagement.

9) This got the most permalink clicks (clicks onto the tweet itself from desktop views), which is gratifying as it is me quoting myself. Clicks through to the June tweet won't appear in the stats for July-September tweets, but it too picked up a fair bit.
8) This got the most impressions, probably because Neil Gaiman retweeted it to his 2.7 million followers, and also the most detail expands, not that there were many details to expand:
7) This got me the most profile clicks and the most new followers, boosted by the fact that Peter Foster himself retweeted it (and he has 47,500 followers):
6) This got the most replies (10), all of which supported my view.
5) This got the most URL clicks, an interesting case of content completely unrelated to either sf or Brexit, but the fact that the lede featured the phrase "a sex dungeon, and Dick Cheney" possible encouraged people to look at the article. It is a great piece.
4) This got the most hashtag clicks (I don't do hashtags as much as I maybe should), and scored well enough on other metrics:
3) And this got the most media views, a clip that I snipped myself from the Parliament web feed; it is being quoted by others to reiforce the basic historical point being made.
2) This got the most engagements, also the most media engagements (helped perhaps by having three media rather than just one). It was retweeted only twice, by Andrew Duff himself (with 16,000 followers) and by sf writer Charles Stross (with 61,000 followers)
1) And finally, my top tweet of the quarter, with the most retweets (63) and the most likes (153);

I'm reasonably satisfied with this methodology for counting the impact of my Tweets, and will repeat at the end of the year.

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

Tags:

The Writing Life, by Annie Dillard

Second paragraph of third chapter:
The cabin was a single small room near the water. Its walls were shrunken planks, not insulated; in January, February, and March, it was cold. There were two small metal beds in the room, two cupboards, some shelves over a little counter, a wood stove, and a table under a window, where I wrote. The window looked out on a bit of sandflat overgrown with thick, varicolored mosses; there were a few small firs where the sandflat met the cobble beach; and there was the water: Puget Sound, and all the sky over it and all the other wild islands in the distance under the sky. It was very grand. But you get used to it. I don't much care where I work. I don't notice things. The door used to blow open and startle me witless. I did, however, notice the cold.
I had not particularly heard of Annie Dillard, but I really liked this book about how to write - or maybe more accurately, how she writes, how she creates the time and space for her to organise her own thoughts, her interactions with other people and with nature, with some repetition of themes but also real consistency. There's then a final chapter about the death of the stunt pilot Dave Rahm, which seems to be included as a worked example, and works OK even if a bit inconsistent with the rest of the book.

It's therefore a bit weird to read a statement on Dillard's website by her husband, informing us that The Writing Life is "a book she repudiates except for the last chapter, the true story of stunt pilot Dave Rahm". It rather spoils my enjoyment to know that the author has allowed the book to stay on the market even if she doesn't believe in it herself any more, and rather violates the spirit of writerly integrity that she seems to advocate in the book. If you are prepared to overlook that, you can get it here.

The Writing Life was my top unread book by a woman, and my top non-fiction book. Next on the former pile is The Bastard of Istanbul, by Elif Şafak; next on the latter is My Century, by Günther Grass.

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

How To Be Both, by Ali Smith

Second paragraph of third section, 21st century:
Cossa, George said.
Second paragraph of third section, 15th century:
Now, he said. This cup here has the Water of Forgetting in it. This cup here has the Water of Remembering. First you drink this. Then you wait a little. Then you drink the other.
One of those prize-winning books from a few years back that I have only now got around to reading. Not a lot to say about it, except that I enjoyed it. It comes in two halves, one about a girl in contemporary Cambridge whose mother has recently died, and who has become obsessed with the portrait of Saint Vincent Ferrer by Francesco del Cossa, and the other about del Cossa who turns out (in this narrative) to have been a woman passing as a man in Renaissance Italy. The two stories echo into each other, and it was a satisfying read. You can get it here.

This was my top unread book acquired in 2018. Next on that pile is Normal People, by Sally Rooney.

My tweets

  • Thu, 12:02: RT @afpfr: L'ancien président de la République Jacques Chirac est mort ce jeudi matin à l'âge de 86 ans, a annoncé son gendre Frédéric Sala…
  • Thu, 12:56: RT @IsabelHardman: Genuinely quite shocked by Boris Johnson describing as 'humbug' Paula Sheriff's complaint about his language in which sh…
  • Thu, 13:30: RT @nick_gutteridge: 1/ EU officials and diplomats were dismayed by last night's furore in Parliament, and events in general over the past…
  • Thu, 15:06: RT @UKPoliticalNews: About to start an internal briefing for colleagues in DC, Berlin, Paris & Brussels on the current state of #Brexit and…
  • Thu, 16:05: RT @nickjbarlow: With the caveat that precise seat calculations from current polls aren't much more than random number generators, those sp…
  • Thu, 16:11: RT @ellieelizaa: I rarely actually tweet, especially about politics - am more of the silent retweeter - but after the chilling scenes in Pa…
  • Thu, 16:12: MEPs reject Romanian and Hungarian nominees for European Commission https://t.co/Qj9Q4IBUcH Big news.
  • Thu, 17:11: RT @nicktolhurst: 1/ A thread on the Jennifer Arcuri & Boris Johnson story & why it’s a bigger scandal than you think. Where to start? T…
  • Thu, 18:54: Anthropological Studies of Religion: An Introductory Text, by Brian Morris https://t.co/93SstNQQXj
  • Thu, 18:55: RT @unamccormack: My first fiction sale was a short story to @dwmtweets, issue #197, in 1993. I was 21. https://t.co/4wWhzTVBVa
Read more...Collapse )
Second paragraph of third chapter:
The high-level questions about the origins of religion that these Victorian scholars posed and the evolutionary framework within which they set their intellectual problems have long ceased to interest or guide anthropologists; nevertheless, the naturalistic and critical stance they took toward religion has continued to bear fruit. What is of interest is that the men who posed these questions — Tylor, Spencer, and Durkheim, in particular - were not only of the highest intellectual caliber but have had a lasting influence on Western culture, the social sciences especially.
Although I've ended up a political activist and pundit, and my father was a professor of political science, I am not all that well versed in political theory myself. This book takes up all the great sociological and anthropological thinkers and surveys what they said about religion, from Hegel to Levi-Strauss. I found it rather frustrating in that very few of them seem to have engaged with what religion actually does in the real world. I did not see the word "priest" used anywhere, for instance. I got a strong impression that a lot of big names in both sociology and (to my surprise) anthropology seem to have arrived at religion as a thing that they needed to factor into their wider ideas about the structure of society.

One person who does come out of it quite well is Weber, who it turns out did not really believe in the Protestant work ethic as such. The only other writer who I felt inspired to find out more about was Levi-Strauss, who turns out to have been born in Brussels; it seemed to me that he was getting to grips with what religious practitioners actually mean.

The sad thing is that rather few anthropologists (or at least, none quoted here) seem to have spent much time looking at the role of religion in developed societies, which surely must hamper their ability to interpret what is going on in less developed societies.

Anyway, not a book I would especially recommend, but you can get it here.

This was my top unread book acquired in 2011. Next on that pile is Luck and the Irish, by Roy Foster.

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

In Time, ed. Xanna Eve Chown

Second paragraph of third story ("The Seventh Fanfic", by Mark Clapham):
This last point was causing Bernice some grief, as she kneeled down holding a multi-tool with various wrench-like arms, trying to work out how to apply it to the twisted front wheel of her bicycle. She had twisted the wheel hitting a bump earlier that day, cutting across rough ground by the Advanced Research Department.
This is at present the last book of Bernice Summerfield stories, looking at her life from school to old age; just seven of them, of which the three standouts for me were "The Bunny’s Curse" by Doris V Sutherland (who I previously knew only for her fannish writing), Simon Guerrier’s "Benny and the Grieving Man" and James Goss's "The Death of Hope". Of little use for those who are not already into the continuity, but great fun for those who are. You can get it here.

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

Tuesday reading

Current
Cloud and Ashes, by Greer Gilman
The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russell
David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens

Last books finished
Cycling in Victorian Ireland, by Brian Griffin
In Ethiopia with a Mule, by Dervla Murphy
A Local Habitation, by Seanan McGuire
Paper Girls Volume 1, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 2, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 3, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 4, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
Paper Girls Volume 5, by Brian K Vaughan and Cliff Chiang

Next books
Be My Enemy, by Ian McDonald
The Bastard of Istanbul, by Eilif Shafak

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

Tags:

De Bourgondiërs, by Bart Van Loo

Second paragraph of third chapter:
De slaapkamer stond vol met flesjes, schalen en kolfjes met planten-aftreksels, azijn, kamferolie en andere middeltjes om de pijn van de aan-staande moeder te verzachten. Hoewel de toortsen, die een parfum van hars verspreidden, de toch al pittige mei-temperaturen helemaal de hoogte in joegen, mocht volgens de traditie geen raam opengezet worden om frisse lucht toe te laten vooraleer de kersverse mama ter kerke was gegaan. De babyuitzet omvatte twee wiegen, eentje op houten wielen voor effectief gebruik en een andere, uiterst luxueus en verfijnd, om mee te pronken. De hertog wilde groots uitpakken met zijn eerstge-borene. Voedster Guyote, die het gewicht van haar kolossale borsten torste, at de klok rond, terwijl Margaretha van Vlaanderen zuchtend het ultieme moment afwachtte. The bedroom was full of bottles, bowls, and flasks with plant infusions, vinegar, camphor oil, and other remedies to ease the pain of the expectant mother. Although the torches, which spread a perfume of resin, raised the already hot May temperatures still further, tradition decreed that no window could be opened to allow fresh air before the brand new mother went to church. The baby setup included two cradles, one on wooden wheels for practical purposes, and another, extremely luxurious and refined, to show off. The duke wanted to go big with his first-born. Guyote, the wetnurse, bearing the weight of her colossal breasts, ate around the clock, while Margaret of Flanders, sighing, waited for it all to be over.
This is a big huge book by a Flemish writer about the history of Burgundy in the time when it included the territory from Switzerland to Friesland and everywhere in between, most notably almost all of what is currently in Belgium. The downfall of Burgundy is treated in a couple of fiction books that I have read - Dorothy Dunnett has the Battle of Nancy in one of the later Niccolo books, and it's a central parallel timeline theme of Mary Gentle's Ash. But I confess I knew very little about it.

This first few chapters look at the emergence of Burgundy as an entity from the confusion of post-Roman Europe, but the meat of the book is an account of the century or so from 1369, when Philip the Bold married Margaret of Flanders and united the territories from Dijon to the North Sea, to the Battle of Nancy in 1477 in which Charles the Bold (Philip's great-grandson) was killed and Burgundy's pretensions came to an end. It's full of incidental detail, the assassination of John the Fearless, Joan of Arc, the Feast of the Pheasant; Van Loo also takes us through the great art of the day and the politics behind it - the big names here are Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden.

If the Burgundians had had better luck, the kingdom might have survived as a single territory to the present day. The presence of so many great cities in the territory meant that there was an early tradition of civic engagement and government. The variety of languages spoken meant that innovative policies about linguistic governance needed to be worked out sooner rather than later. Revolts tended to end with settlements involving greater rights for citizens rather than repression (though not always). The argument is made that some of the foundations of the modern state were laid in medieval Burgundy.

I must say that for me I found the overlapping sovereignties of the period rather reminiscent of today's situation in Belgium. My home is less than 5km from the linguistic frontier, which was only drawn in 1962 and became a provincial boundary only in 1995 when Brabant was divided. But at the same time we are only 10km from Tourinnes-le-Grosse, which was an exclave of the Prince-bishopric of Liège within the Duchy of Flanders for many years. The attempt to govern Belgium as a unitary state from 1830 to 1962 was the real historical anomaly.

Even after Nancy, it wasn't all over; Charles the Bold's daughter Margaret was of age and ruled well for five years until her death after a hunting accident in 1482, aged 25. Perhaps that is the real turning point. (And perhaps it's telling that historical narrative, including this one, tend to concentrate on the disaster of Nancy without reflecting that Margaret inherited most of her father's territories intact and the disintegration happened after her death, not his.)

A recently arrived diplomat told me a couple of days ago that he had been recommended this book as a good entry into the history of this part of the world. I think my advice would be to wait until there is an English translation. It's very good, but at 519 pages of detailed yet also idiomatic Dutch, it's a tough slog for the non-native speaker. You can get it here.

My tweets

Tags:

The 2019 Hugos, part two

I ended the first installment with the close of nominations and the announcement of the finalists. One point that should be flagged up to future administrators is the issue of finalists with a large number of nominees, each of whom could therefore be entitled to a place in the (very full) pre-ceremony reception and the Hugo losers party, as well as to a Hugo finalist pin each and potentially even to a trophy each if they win. One finalist presented us with a list of sixteen different people whose names they wanted to see listed as part of their team. We persuaded them to pare it back, and in the end no finalist was listed on the ballot with more than eight individuals (which was also the maximum we had allowed in 2017 in Helsinki). On the one hand, of course it's good to celebrate team efforts, and everyone likes the egoboo of seeing their name on the ballot paper. On the other, resources are limited.

Another strain on resources is that there are now six finalists per category rather than five, but my attempt to reverse this recent change was contemptuously rejected by the Business Meeting, so I guess we are stuck with it. (Apparently one person at the Business Meeting suggested that Hugo administrators should be paid more to reflect the increase in workload. Ho ho, very funny.) I will save deeper commentary on the Business Meeting for another post.

Another point about the ballot that I haven't previously mentioned in public is that we did have to invoke the only rule I have ever successfully got through the Business Meeting that was not subsequently reversed, the loosening of the boundary between Best Novel and Best Novelette from 35,000-45,000 words (as it had been before) to 32,000-48,000 words. Binti: the Night Masquerade, by Nnedi Okorafor, has 47,885 words so just sneaked in under the new rule, which was in force this year for the first time. Another finalist that needed some flexibility was The Little Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, which received the most nominations in the Best Novella category (which it went on to win) but is under the nominal 17,500 threshold in both the French original (14,838 words) and the standard English translation (17,110 words). Fortunately the 20% flexibility means that the effective lower limit for a novella is 14,000 words.

The ballot having been sorted, we then activated Kathy Bond, Kat Jones and Tina Forsyth, who did a very good job of assembling the 2019 voter packet. It was (understandably) difficult to get much from some of the 2019 Best Art Book finalists. It also turned out to be simply impossible to get copyright clearance for the 1944 material, apart from one author's estate who were co-operative (but one author is not enough). Most of the relevant material is readily available online anyway, of course, and my recommendation to future years is simply to publish the links where they are available and capitalise on the activism of fanac.org.

It took a couple of weeks to get online voting up and running, and by the time it was ready, the packet was so close to completion that we decided to launch both together on 11 May, along with Site Selection. We had very few complaints (and quite a few compliments) about the voting interface. Again the helpdesk team were essential to resolving these issues as they came up. There were a few queries regarding the eligibility or relevance of some of the material submitted for the 2019 packet, but in general people were appreciative.

Early voting on the final ballot turned out to be a much better guide to the final result than at the nominations phase. I recorded the state of play on 20 May, when 400 or so of the eventual 3097 votes had been cast, and at that point the eventual winner was already in the lead in all 20 of the 2019 categories, and 9 of the 11 Retro Hugo 1944 categories. Things swung back and forth, though, and in the final days before nominations closed, four categories in particular (two for 2019 and two Retros) seesawed as the votes came in - at one point, two of them were actually tied, and I started to make anxious calculations about how many trophies might be needed. In the end, however, the very last voters turned out to have similar tastes to the very first voters, and all four of the cases that had been tight runs on 29 July had been decisively resolved by close of play on 1 August. (Two completely different 2019 categories ended up being decided by less than ten votes. Every vote counts.)

My own tastes were not particularly aligned with the results! I voted for just two of the 2019 winners, and three of the Retro winners. I haven't kept track over the years, but this seems to me lower than usual! I'm not going to write up my Hugo votes retrospectively, but I just want to call attention to one finalist which I was sorry to see placing only third in its category: Tess of the Road, by Rachel Hartman, a gritty fantasy take on Tess of the D'Urbervilles, critiquing rape culture, which I found a lot more to my taste than Hardy. It's the third book set in the same universe, and I am inclined to seek out the first two.

The other finalist which I felt very sorry about was Janelle Monáe's superb Dirty Computer, which outrageously finished only in sixth place in Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form - the same happened in 2017 for another music piece. (Incidentally, Tessa Thompson was in two Long Form finalists as well as Dirty Computer.) I was particularly struck that it got the second highest number of first preferences in each round, and then failed to attract transfers. Did voters not bother to watch it? If you missed it, you missed a treat: here it is.

The close of voting was on 31 July, which as luck would have it coincided with my office summer party, a low-key affair in which we all threw axes at targets.
The helpdesk team, now augmented with Kat Jones, were on the case and in fact the final night of voting was fairly quiet; I could not do the final count immediately, of course, because Colette needed to input the eight paper ballots that had come in, but as mentioned above the trends were already pretty clear. Once the results were calculated, I immediately notified Dell Magazines, for the Campbell Award; Sara Felix, for the Lodestar Award; and the engraver who was making plaques for the Hugo and Retro Hugo trophies (Martin Logan, of The Trophy Room in Belfast, in case anyone needs an engraver in future).

I have already commented on a couple of aspects of the awards - my breakdown of the Retro results is here, of the 2019 Hugos here (including pessimistic speculation about the future of the Best Fanzine category), and my thoughts on Best Art Book here.

One thing that did surprise me was the number of requests which came in after close of nominations asking for access to the Hugo voters packet - indeed, we received one such message only a couple of days ago. We do our best to be clear that the packet is available only during the voting period, and also that publishers are free to participate or not, and also to choose to what extent they follow our (strong) guidance about what format to supply packet material in. One voter in particular sent several tetchy messages blaming us for the difficulties they were having in accessing some of the finalists. In fairness, this person was the exception; most people seemed to understand the voluntary nature of publisher participation, and also the volunteer nature of Hugo administration.

And so it was time for the convention itself. Eleanor came and picked me up from Loughbrickland with a van full of Hugos - apparently concerns were expressed at the previous day's Committee meeting that this meant there was a single point of failure for a large chunk of WSFS, with me and the trophies all in the same place. Fortunately, we made it safely, though Eleanor's van broke down on the way home the next day.

Some of us attended a civic reception at the Mansion House that evening. Here Charles Stewart Parnell is keeping an eye on deputy mayor Patrick Costello, of the Green Party.

Ian Moore came into his own at this point as Hugo Wrangler, ensuring that the trophies were all in secure storage (there was a cute but somewhat fictional skit about this at the actual ceremony) and available when needed. We also had two on display in a Hold A Hugo stall in the Exhibits space, for people to take pictures of themselves with the trophies.

I was really pleased to be able to introduce a number of non-fannish friends to fandom via the Worldcon. First of all, my mother and her partner came to the opening ceremony and then came again for most of the day on Sunday. Also my former colleague Michael, his twin brother John and their friend artist Mike O'Dwyer came on my recommendation and loved it; so did my current colleague Ariuna and her aspiring writer daughter Gugii, who helped me hump Hugos at one point (and being Mongolian, though not registered as such, they may have increased the number of nationalities represented by another notch).

On the Thursday morning I attended a panel on the Retro Hugos (which Ian Moore has written up in detail) and then participated in one on Flann O'Brien; one of the other participants, Frank McNally of the Irish Times, wrote that up for the paper and I have posted my own contribution to it, as performed with Pádraig Ó Méalóid.

The opening ceremony on the first night included also the presentation of the Retro Hugo awards by the Guests of Honour and featured artists, a dry run for the real thing. Only two of the winners had representatives present to accept the Retro trophies, John Hammond (accompanied by his daughter) for his grandfather John W. Campbell Jr, and Patrick Nielsen Hayden for the estate of Fritz Leiber. Over the next few weeks after the convention, we gradually found homes for most of the trophies, though the Dramatic Presentation categories proved tricky, neither Fox nor Universal displaying much interest in accepting them. Eventually I made contact with Curt Siodmak's 85-year-old son for the award for Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man; I am still trying to make contact with Ernst Lubitsch's family for Heaven Can Wait.

I must say that this has left me feeling ambivalent about the Retro Hugos (which we did not have in 2017). I myself quite enjoy reading classics, but I found several of the Dramatic Presentation finalists embarrassingly weak, and it's tremendously difficult to assess the Fanzine and Fan Writer categories. Administering them is a significant extra dollop of work on top of running the regular Hugos; you have to open nominations in all categories, and then present trophies which cost money (to people who died long ago) at a ceremony which takes time (where few of their heirs will be present), constraining resources that could have been used for other things. The real joy of the Hugos for me is a shared celebration with the winners; for the Retros, the winners are all dead. I would counsel future Worldcons to think long and hard before deciding to run the Retro Hugos. (CoNZealand had already committed to running the 1945 Retro Hugos before my views were crystallised by the experience of doing it this year.)

On the Friday I had the interesting experience of moderating a panel on politics and sff, with my co-panellists being writers from Israel, Australia and Japan. We came up with a list of recommendations of sff about politics which I commend. That evening, Vince organised another spectacular concert of sf-related music as he had done in London in 2014.

On the Saturday morning I actually skipped out of Worldcon to Trinity College, the other side of the river, where there was a conference going on about Tudor and Stuart Ireland. Unfortunately the writer of the one paper I had really wanted to hear had had to cancel at the last moment, but my disappointment was more than compensated by a fascinating presentation from Melissa Shiels on "Gifts of Apparel and Tudor Political Gift-Giving Strategies." She had actually got into full Tudor constume for this and explained to a fascinated (but very small) crowd afterwards how all the clothes fit together.


Back at the CCD, I also managed to sit in on a panel featuring Erle Korshak. Erle is 96, attended the first ever Worldcon in 1939 and briefly chaired the second in 1940. Hugo business unfortunately took me away half way through the panel, but it was a real thrill to be in the presence of a physical connection to the very start of things.


Sunday of course was the big Hugo day, though it started with my unsuccessful attempt to engage with the Business Meeting (of which more some other time). I realised to my horror that although I had brought tux, white shirt and bow tie, I had neglected to pack cuff-links; David Matthewman, as so often, came to the rescue with a lovely pair of Tardis cuff-links which were exactly what was needed. And then we were into setup for the ceremony - this fantastic set with the trophies sitting along a replica of the Samuel Beckett Bridge, which is just outside the CCD.

Someone got a great picture of Ian Moore with the extra Hugo Awards backstage (obviously not all could fit on the bridge).

My wife came and joined me for the ceremony, but my enjoyment of the pre-Hugo reception was marred and curtailed by a moment of horror - I had forgotten the pins for finalists in the John W. Campbell Award, and hastened to my (nearby) hotel room and back to get them, just catching the very end of the reception. In the end I only handed two pins out on the night and sent the other four by mail afterwards.

That is of course not what people will remember about the 2019 John W. Campbell Award, which as it turns out will be the last of that name. The combination of Ada Palmer's impassioned and political speech introducing the award, Jeanette Ng's impassioned and political speech accepting the award but calling out John W. Campbell for his political views, and the Great Subtitling Disaster (described well in Ada Palmer's piece) all made for an electrifying start to the evening. Here is Jeannette Ng's speech:

For what it's worth, I had become very uneasy myself about continuing the association with Campbell after reading Alec Nevala-Lee's Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, which was a finalist for Best Related Work; Paul Cornell summed it up pretty well in a tweet:

History records what happened next; Dell Magazines quickly reached the same conclusion and changed the name to the Astounding Award for Best New Writer, and CoNZealand has announced that it will administer the award under that name. John W. Campbell is likely to continue winning Retro Hugo Awards for Best Professional Editor (Short Form) if future Worldcons continue running Retro Hugos. Detailed investigations of Hugo Gernsback himself have failed to turn up anything quite as alarming.

My own speech was in the middle of the ceremony, a slight variation from practice driven partly by the director's desire not to have too many speeches at the beginning and also partly to give cover for a costume change. My text is as follows (not quite what I actually said, but what I meant to say):
It’s amazing to be here. Growing up in Northern Ireland in the 1980s, I anxiously chased down every Hugo winner that I could find from my local library as a teenager. I never dreamed that one day I would administer the awards myself, or stand here in Dublin to share the results with you.

I want to thank a number of people who made this all possible: my Deputy, Sanna Lopperi-Vihinen; the WSFS Division Head, Vince Docherty; the Deputy Division Head, Mark Meenan; the software gurus, Eemeli Aro, Arnaud Koebel, and especially David Matthewman who not only engineered the interface but also lent me these rather nice TARDIS cuff-links for this evening; eligibility researchers Claire Brialey and Mark Plummer; Hugo Packet team Kathy Bond, Kat Jones and Kristina Forsyth; Ian Moore, our head Hugo Wrangler; Colette Fozard for processing paper ballots; Ila Khan, supporting the division; Niall Harrison, who lent a hand at the start; Rebecca Hewett, Brent Smart and Terry Neill on the Hugo Helpdesk; and on the creative side, James Shields, Fionna O’Sullivan and Mark Slater who between them generated the amazing nominations video, and Eleanor Wheeler and Jim Fitzpatrick for the beautiful base. And Joshua Beatty and the whole Events team for showing us such a good time this evening. My wife Anne for her support through times of Hugo frenzy. And James Bacon for everything.

3097 votes were cast for the final ballot, 3089 online and 8 by paper ballot. At nominations stage the number of votes cast was 1800, (1797 electronic and 3 paper). Two categories this evening were decided by margins of less than ten votes. Every vote counts, and every vote was counted. Full statistics will be available online after the ceremony is over.

Some of the finalists will go home with these lovely trophies tonight. All of you are winners, whether you came first or sixth in your category. Thanks to all of you who have participated, all of you who voted and all of you who helped. Thank you for sharing your joy and love of Science Fiction and Fantasy.

(Picture by Roshin Sen)

I then announced the winner of the Best Series award, the Wayfarers series by Becky Chambers, which I have hugely enjoyed. The look of awestruck joy on her face as I presented the trophy to her was almost reward enough in itself for everything I had done in preparing the awards.


As the voting deadline came closer, it had become ever clearer that The Calculating Stars (which is about a pioneering woman astronaut) was likely to win Best Novel, and Vince Docherty had the genius idea of asking Jeanette Epps (who is in fact a woman astronaut) to present it as the climax to the ceremony. That's not the Hugo administrator's call, of course, but Joshua Beatty, the ceremony director, enthusiastically agreed with the idea. Joshua and Stefan scripted it very well, and I am sure that the vast majority of people in the hall did not work out who the winner was from the clue of Jeanette making the presentation, in the brief interval before the award was announced. It certainly meant that the ceremony ended on a high.

My wife and I spent a long time chatting to various people at the CCD after the ceremony, so I did not get to the Hugo Losers Party until after the crisis of getting people in was over, and had a good time (though was nervously looking out for Campbell finalists to give finalist pins to). Not everybody had a good time, and George R.R. Martin has explained what happened here (with historical followups here and here). It's pretty unfortunate, and I think Paul Kincaid expressed the perceptions of many on the evening: I was supposed to give a talk on Monday morning, but I had realised on the Saturday that that simply wasn't going to happen, and cancelled it. In the end we spent almost the entire day packing and sending Hugos and Retro Hugos where we had addresses for them, a large team assembling packages and a smaller away team taking them to the nearest post office for despatch.

Eleanor Wheeler, Mark Meenan, Alan Cargo, Ian Moore, Bridget Chee

One Hugo that did not get sent to its winner was the award for Best Related Work, which was won by Archive of Our Own. AO3 very generously decided that their Hugo should become part of the Worldcon Heritage Organization's Worldcon History Exhibit of Hugo trophies, which hopefully will be displayed at future Worldcons. This was a tremendously generous act by AO3, and the vast majority of AO3's thousands of contributors have been entirely correct and appropriate in their celebration of their joint achievement.

The current kerfuffle between the WSFS Mark Protection Committee and AO3 is regrettable and its escalation was avoidable. Will Frank, who is in fact a trademark lawyer and also the designated Hugo Administrator for 2021, has written the only piece about it that I will link to here.

Anyway, Eleanor took me away as the closing ceremonies were going, and we have acquired from her one of her larger pieces which now sits in our back garden as a permanent reminder of the 2019 Hugos.


I'm on the Hugo team again for next year, but it is unlikely that I will be able to attend CoNZealand, so my input will be done remotely.

Congratulations again to all the winners, whether I voted for you or not.

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

West Side Story (1961)

West Side Story won the Oscar for Best Motion Picture of 1960, and picked up another nine: Best Director (Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins), Best Supporting Actor (George Chakiris as Bernardo), Best Supporting Actress (Rita Moreno as Anita), Best Art Direction, Best Set Decoration (Color), Best Cinematography (Color), Best Costume Design (Color), Best Film Editing, Best Original Score and Best Sound; it lost out only in Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium, to Judgement at Nuremberg. Jerome Robbins also won a special Academy Award, so you could count the total as eleven, level with Ben-Hur, Titanic and The Return of the King.


The other films that were nominated for Best Motion Picture were Fanny, The Guns of Navarone, The Hustler and Judgment at Nuremberg; I have seen none of them. West Side Story ranks top on one IMDB rating of 1961 films and fourth on the other, behind Breakfast at Tiffany's, 101 Dalmatians and Yojimbo. I have at least seen 101 Dalmatians; the other two films from that year that I know I have seen are Tintin and the Golden Fleece, and The Young Ones. That year's Hugo went to the second series of The Twilight Zone. IMHO West Side Story is the best of them. Here's a trailer (not a contemporary trailer, unfortunately, I couldn't find one):

This is a musical, the first Oscar-wining film based on a stage musical (we've had musicals in this series, and films based on stage plays, but this is the first to tick both boxes). I also note that of 34 Oscar winners so far, this is the tenth set in or around New York. (The nine others were The Broadway Melody, most of The Great Ziegfeld, You Can't Take It with You, Going My Way, The Lost Weekend, most of Gentleman's Agreement, most of All About Eve, On The Waterfront and The Apartment. But it will be another eight years until the next one, Midnight Cowboy, and four of the ones in between are set in England.)

As if you didn't know, it's based on the rivalry between two gangs in the Upper West Side of New York, one white (the Jets), the other Puerto Rican (the Sharks), with much of the plot taken from Romeo and Juliet including duels and balcony scene between Tony of the Jets and Maria, whose brother leads the Sharks; but what makes it justly famous is the music and dancing. In fact, I'm now going to talk quite a lot about the song "America", in which the Puerto Ricans discuss the ups and downs of living in America rather than back home, so here it is - just watch it before you go on to read the rest of this, and appreciate Robbins' spectacular choreography, and also the Oscar-winning performances of George Chakiris and Rita Moreno who lead the scene and Bernardo and his girlfriend Anita (Tony and Maria being elsewhere):

As so often, I'm going to start by talking about race. This is the thirty-fourth Oscar-winning film I have seen, twenty-six of which have been adaptations of other work, and the song "America" is the first case of commentary on race that has been deliberately made more incisive than the original version by the screenwriters. In the original stage version, it is sung by the Puerto Rican girls alone (the boys having left the scene), with Rosalia (in blue) the sole holdout for the view that life was better back home and the others trying to persuade her of America's merits (and winning the argument). In the film version, it's girls vs boys, with the girls (including Rosalia) advocating the good points of America and the Shark boys (again in blue) criticising the racism that they enounter as Puerto Ricans, and doing better in the argument than Rosalia does in the original version. Compare and contrast:
Stage version Film version
ROSALIA:
Puerto Rico
You lovely island
Island of tropical breezes.
Always the pineapples growing,
Always the coffee blossoms blowing...
ANITA:
Puerto Rico
You ugly island
Island of tropic diseases.
Always the hurricanes blowing,
Always the population growing
And the money owing
And the babies crying
And the bullets flying
I like the island Manhattan
Smoke on your pipe
And put that in!
ANITA:
Puerto Rico
My heart's devotion
Let it sink back in the ocean
Always the hurricanes blowing
Always the population growing
And the money owing
And the sunlight streaming
And the natives steaming
I like the island Manhattan
Smoke on your pipe
And put that in!
ALL EXCEPT ROSALIA:
I like to be in America!
OK by me in America!
Everything free in America
For a small fee in America!
GIRLS:
I like to be in America!
Okay by me in America!
Everything free in America -

BERNARDO:
For a small fee in America!
ROSALIA:
I like the city of San Juan-


ANITA:
I know a boat you can get on.

ROSALIA:
Hundreds of flowers in full bloom-


ANITA:
Hundreds of people in each room!
ANITA:
Buying on credit is so nice!

BERNARDO:
One look at us and they charge twice!


ROSALIA:
I have my own washing machine!

INDIO:
What will you have though to keep clean?
ALL EXCEPT ROSALIA:
Automobile in America,
Chromium steel in America,
Wire-spoke wheel in America-
Very big deal in America-
ANITA:
Skyscrapers bloom in America!

ROSALIA:
Cadillacs zoom in America!

TERESITA:
Industry boom in America!

BOYS:
Twelve in a room in America!
ROSALIA:
I'll drive a Buick to San Juan-


ANITA:
If there's a road you can drive on.

ROSALIA:
I'll give my cousin a free ride-


ANITA:
How you get all of them inside?
ANITA:
Lots of new housing with more space

BERNARDO:
Lots of doors slamming in our face


ANITA:
I'll get a terrace apartment -

BERNARDO:
Better get rid of your accent!
ALL EXCEPT ROSALIA:
An immigrant goes to America,
Many hellos in America;
Nobody knows in America
Puerto Rico's in America.
ANITA:
Life can be bright in America

BOYS:
If you can fight in America


GIRLS:
Life is all right in America

BOYS:
If you're all white in America
ROSALIA:
When will I go back to San Juan-


ANITA:
When you will shut up and get gone!

ROSALIA:
I'll give them new washing machine-


ANITA:
What have they got there to keep clean?
GIRLS:
Here you are free and you have pride

BOYS:
Long as you stay on your own side


GIRLS:
Free to be anything you choose

BOYS:
Free to wait tables and shine shoes
ALL EXCEPT ROSALIA:
I like the shores of America!
Comfort is yours in America!
Knobs on the doors in America,
Wall-to-wall floors in America!
BERNARDO:
Everywhere grime in America
Organized crime in America
Terrible time in America


ANITA:
You forget I'm in America!
ROSALIA:
I'll bring TV to San Juan


ANITA:
If there's a current to turn on.

ROSALIA:
Everyone there will get big cheer!


ANITA:
Everyone there will have moved here!
BERNARDO:
I think I'll go back to San Juan


ANITA:
I know a boat you can get on
(GIRLS: Bye Bye!)

BERNARDO:
Everyone there will give big cheer!


ANITA:
Everyone there will have moved here!
(The song also has some nostalgia for me because Roy Castle used it as the intro to the American secion of his TV show Record Breakers in the mid-70s.)

Having given the film version of West Side story a big plus mark for being more woke than the original stage show here (and note also that the police on both stage and screen are frank in their desire to see the Puerto Ricans go back home), it then has to be given two strong minuses for errors in the other direction. Firstly (and eerily relevant for Canadian politics right now) is that all of the "Puerto Ricans" are blacked up - including Rita Moreno, who actually is Puerto Rican. (She will be in next year's Steven Spielberg remake, playing the role of Tony's boss, the storekeeper. She will turn 88 this December.) Siblings Gus and Gina Trekonis appear on opposite sides, Gus in brownface as Indio, one of the Sharks, and Gina as Graziella, one of the Jet girls. (Both stayed in the entertainment industry, but neither in acting; Gus became a director, his credits including 22 episodes of Baywatch (he was also married to Goldie Hawn at one point), and Gina went into wardrobe and costume design.)


Also, the ethnic group that most famously inhabits the Upper West Side is practically invisible. If you squint, you can see half a dozen African Americans in the crowd scenes at the dance, but none of them gets to speak (or even sing).



It's a romance set between young people from two fairly conservative backgrounds. But Tony and Maria both get a lot more character development than Romeo or Juliet. Both of them actually have jobs, for one thing. And the women, though in the minority, certainly have agency.

It's also interesting that unlike in Romeo and Juliet, where the young people are continuing a feud started by their parents, West Side Story has introduced an element of generational conflict as well, with the older folks abent or mocked as in "Dear Officer Krupke":


Let's also note the character Anybodys, played by Susan Oakes, described in the script as a tomboy but who would certainly be coded genderqueer these days.

A couple of genre points. Of the two leading actors, Natalie Wood's fate is alas all too well known, but Richard Beymer looked familar to me; and then I realised that thirty years on, he was Ben Horne, the local oligarch in Twin Peaks.



Glad Hand, the MC at the dance, is played by John Astin, who found fame a few years later as Gomez Addams in The Addams Family. (His adoptive son, Sean Astin, was Sam Gamgee in The Lord of the Rings.)



Anyway. What makes the film is the spectacular music and dancing. We've had Bernstein before (On the Waterfront), but this is just amazing. The most interesting musically is probably "Cool", three quarters of the way through (NB the Jets get more of the good dances):


But it's all good, starting with the opening:


On through the dance at the gym:


Then "Maria":


We've already covered "America", which separates "Maria" from "Tonight" (a wise change frmo the stage version in which the two big romantic songs were consecutive):


The Shark girls get a great number with "I Feel Pretty":


The "Tonight Quintet" clearly inspired a lot of similar scenes in musicals:


And "Somewhere" points to the tragic ending.


I enjoyed this a lot and am putting it right up in my top six, below Bridge on the River Kwai but above The Best Years of our Lives. You can get it here.



Next up, Lawrence of Arabia.

1920s: Wings (1927-28) | The Broadway Melody (1928-29)
1930s: All Quiet on the Western Front (1929-30) | Cimarron (1930-31) | Grand Hotel (1931-32) | Cavalcade (1932-33) | It Happened One Night (1934) | Mutiny on the Bounty (1935, and books) | The Great Ziegfeld (1936) | The Life of Emile Zola (1937) | You Can't Take It with You (1938) | Gone with the Wind (1939, and book)
1940s: Rebecca (1940) | How Green Was My Valley (1941) | Mrs. Miniver (1942) | Casablanca (1943) | Going My Way (1944) | The Lost Weekend (1945) | The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) | Gentleman's Agreement (1947) | Hamlet (1948) | All the King's Men (1949)
1950s: All About Eve (1950) | An American in Paris (1951) | The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) | From Here to Eternity (1953) | On The Waterfront (1954, and book) | Marty (1955) | Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) | The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) | Gigi (1958) | Ben-Hur (1959)
1960s: The Apartment (1960) | West Side Story (1961)
21st century: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )
In a break from my usual practice, here’s the entry for today, 20 September:
The Doctor Meets Two Loch Ness Monsters

The group of Zygons whose spaceship crash-landed in Loch Ness lived beneath the loch for centuries before they discovered their home planet had been destroyed and decided to conquer Earth in Terror of the Zygons (1975). They brought with them an embryo Skarasen, which grew into a huge dinosaur-like armoured cyborg. The Zygons depended upon its lactic fluid for sustenance, and used it as a defence and a weapon. Over the years, people caught glimpses of the Skarasen as it swam in the loch, or travelled across local land, and it became known as the Loch Ness Monster. When the Zygons were defeated and their spaceship destroyed, the Skarasen returned from London - where the Fourth Doctor had prevented it from attacking an energy conference - to Loch Ness, the only home it knew.

But the Skarasen may not be the only monster in Loch Ness. In Timelash (1985), the Sixth Doctor encountered the mutated ruler of the planet Karfel - the Borad. Although he appeared to his people as a soft-spoken old man, the real Borad was a mutated scientist named Magellan - who was fused with a reptilian Morlox when an experiment involving Mustakozene-80 went wrong and Magellan and the Morlox creature underwent spontaneous tissue amalgamation. The result was the Borad - a combined mutant with greater strength, intellect and longevity, who intended to repeat the experiment to create a consort for himself - using the Doctor's companion Peri.

Defeated by the Doctor, the Borad fell into the Timeiash, a time corridor that transported him back to twelfth-century Scotland, close to Loch Ness. Whether the Borad survived as another Loch Ness Monster, or was killed by the Skarasen, the Zygons, or someone else is unknown.
1975 Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart makes his last regular appearance in Terror of the Zygons Part 4.

1980 The Leisure Hive Part 4

1986 The Trial of a Time Lord Part 3

1989 Battlefield Part 3

2014 Time Heist
Justin Richards is the most prolific of New Who authors, and has more hits than misses; this is a very nice if basic assembly of 366 short pieces about Old Who and New Who stories and characters (including one for 29 February), about half of which are related to the anniversary of a relevant broadcast episode. There is nothing here that is surprising to any long-term fan, but I found it an attractive format. (I tried doing something similar myself with my Whoniversary blog posts a few years back but I cannot claim that it was better than this.) Published in 2016, so it takes us up to The Husbands of River Song, the second Peter Capaldi season. You can get it here.

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

Tags:

Second and third paragraphs of third chapter of Make Out With Murder:
“She might try it a second time.”
“She might, but there were too many other things she liked better. And if she did try it again, it wouldn’t be with a needle. She’s terrified of needles. Some nurse had to give her an injection once and botched it, kept stabbing around trying to find the vein, and she still has nightmares about it. Still had nightmares about it. Oh, shit.”
Secon paragraph of third chapter of The Topless Tulip Caper:
I’m taking matters into my own hands and leaving out some items that never did seem to have any more bearing on the case than the fascinating fact about dry edible beans. That still leaves plenty of bits and pieces to report from Haig’s questioning of Tulip.
Two rather slight mystery stories set in contemporary (ie mid-70s) New York. The narrator, Chip Harrison, is apparently based on the unpleasant Holden Caulfield of The Catcher in the Rye, but has grown up a little bit and is working as assistant to Leo Haig, a New York detective explicitly based on Nero Wolfe but with comic differences. I had read The Topless Tulip Caper many years ago, and hunted it and its prequel down out of morbid curiosity (The Topless Tulip Caper has a memorably unerotic blowjob scene).

Both books begin with a young naked woman being poisoned to death, and end with Haig exposing the murderer in his study in front of all the other suspects and two reluctantly impressed policemen. In between both have a rambling plot involving several more murders, and plenty of sex for the narrator. There is a struggle towards social commentary which doesn’t quite get anywhere. It’s pretty mindless stuff which I might have found funnier if I had ever actually read a Nero Wolfe book. You can get Make Out With Murder here and The Topless Tulip Caper here.

My tweets

Tags:

The Devil in Amber, by Mark Gatiss

Second paragraph of third chapter:
I'd had an uneasy night — once my eyes closed — caught in a nightmarish New York of the future, all sky-scraping apartment blocks and rocket ships, as in those unpleasant German films. The dream-me, wearing only queerly tight underwear with President Coolidge's name embroidered about the waist, sauntered past the Algonquin, the pavement transformed into a howling white tunnel of cocaine. Overhead, Hubbard the Cupboard was performing dazzling aerobatics like Lucky Lindy, but the smoke trailing from his rocket-ship transformed into narcotics too, falling on my shoulders like snow. As his machine roared past, I distinctly saw bright rivulets of blood pouring from the aviator's nostrils and the dead man laughing at me, fit to burst.
Sequel to The Vesuvius Club, which I haven’t read. Painter and occasional spy Lucifer Box gets mixed up in improbable occult conspiracies involving weird politics in 1920s New York and England. I didn’t get much out of this; I felt that Box was a little too pleased with himself, and the conspiracy both too implausibly complex and not sufficiently connected with the real history of the time to be very satisfying. I’ve liked most of Gatiss’s Doctor Who books, but didn’t get much out of this. You can get it here.

This was my top unread book acquired in 2017. Next on that list is The Last Days of New Paris, by China Miéville.

My tweets

Read more...Collapse )

Tuesday reading

Current
In Ethiopia with a Mule, by Dervla Murphy
A Local Habitation, by Seanan McGuire
Cycling in Victorian Ireland, by Brian Griffin

Last books finished
De Bourgondiërs, by Bart Van Loo
In Time, ed. Xanna Eve Chown
Anthropological Studies of Religion: An Introductory Text, by Brian Morris
How To Be Both, by Ali Smith
The Writing Life, by Annie Dillard
Lethbridge-Stewart: The Havoc Files, ed. Shaun Russell

Next books
The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russell
David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens

Latest Month

October 2019
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by yoksel