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A question you had never thought of asking

How many people have got votes in the U.S. electoral college on three or more occasions?

The answer is twenty-two:

George Washington:

1) Elected President in 1789, with 69 votes of a possible 69
2) Elected President in 1792, with 132 votes of a possible 132
3) despite announcing that he did not want the job again, got 2 votes out of a possible 138 in 1796.

John Adams:
1) Elected Vice-President in 1789, with 34 votes of a possible 69
2) Elected Vice-President in 1792, with 77 votes of a possible 132

3) Elected President in 1796, with 71 votes of a possible 138
4) Runner-up in the 1800 presidential election, with 65 votes of a possible 138

John Jay:
1) Runner-up in the 1789 election, with 9 votes of a possible 69
2) A long way behind in the 1796 election, with 5 votes of a possible 138
3) A long way behind in the 1800 election, with 1 vote of a possible 138

George Clinton:
1) a long way behind in the 1789 election, with 3 electoral votes out of a possible 69
2) Runner-up in the 1792 election, with 50 votes out of a possible 132
3) A long way behind in the 1796 election, with 7 votes of a possible 138
4) Elected Vice-President in 1804 with 162 votes out of 176
5) Elected Vice-President in 1808 with 113 votes out of 175
(also got 6 votes for President)

Thomas Jefferson:
1) A long way behind in the 1792 election, with 4 votes of a possible 132
2) Elected Vice-President in 1796, with 68 votes of a possible 138
3) Topped the electoral college vote, jointly with Aaron Burr, in 1800 with 73 votes of a possible 138; subsequently elected President by the House of Representatives.
4) Elected President in 1804 with 162 votes out of 176

Aaron Burr:
1) A long way behind in the 1792 election, with 1 vote of a possible 132
2) Some way off in the 1796 election, with 30 votes of a possible 138
3) Topped the electoral college vote, jointly with Thomas Jefferson, in 1800 with 73 votes of a possible 138; subsequently chosen as Vice-President by the House of Representatives

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney:
1) A long way behind in the 1796 election, with 1 vote out of a possible 138
2) Some way off in the 1800 election (where he was effectively Adams' running-mate) with 64 votes of a possible 138
3) Runner-up for President in 1804 with 14 votes out of 176
4) Runner-up for President in 1808 with 47 votes out of 175


Rufus King:
1) Runner-up for Vice-President in 1804, with 12 votes out of 176
2) Runner-up for Vice-President in 1808, with 47 votes out of 175

3) Runner-up for President in 1816, with 34 votes out of 217

John Quincy Adams:
1) Got the only vote not cast for James Monroe in the 1820 Presidential election
2) Came second in the 1824 electoral college vote for President, with 84 out of 261, but subsequently elected President by the House of Representatives
3) Runner-up for President in 1828, with 83 votes out of 261

Andrew Jackson:
1) Topped the electoral college vote for President with 99 votes out of 261 in 1824, but lost the election in the House of Representatives; also got 13 votes for Vice-President that year
2) Elected President in 1828, with 178 votes out of 261
3) Elected President in 1832, with 219 votes out of 286

Henry Clay:
1) Came fourth out of four in the electoral college vote for President in 1824, with 37 votes out of 261; also got 2 votes for Vice-President that year (again coming last, of the six candidates)
2) Runner-up for President in 1832, with 49 votes out of 268
3) Runner-up for President in 1844, with 105 votes out of 275

Martin Van Buren:
1) Got 9 votes out of 261 for Vice-President in 1824
2) Elected Vice-President in 1828, with 189 votes out of 286

3) Elected President in 1836, with 170 votes out of 294
4) Runner-up for President in 1840, with 60 votes out of 294


Thomas Andrews Hendricks:
1) Runner-up for President in 1872, with 42 votes out of 349 (the Democratic candidate, Horace Greeley, had died, and Hendricks got the majority of his votes)
2) Runner-up for Vice-President in 1876, with 184 votes out of 369 (even though the Tilden/Hendricks ticket had won the popular vote)
3) Elected Vice-President in 1884, with 219 votes out of 401 (and then died a year after the election)

Grover Cleveland:
1) Elected President in 1884, with 219 votes out of 401
2) Runner-up for President in 1888, with 168 votes out of 401
3) Elected President in 1892, with 277 votes out of 444

William Jennings Bryan:
1) Runner-up for President in 1896, with 176 votes out of 447
2) Runner-up for President in 1900, with 155 votes out of 447
3) Runner-up for President in 1908, with 162 votes out of 483

Theodore Roosevelt:
1) Elected Vice-President in 1900, with 292 votes out of 447 (and became President on McKinley's death in September 1901)
2) Elected President in 1904, with 336 votes out of 476
3) Runner-up for President in 1912, with 88 votes out of 531

Franklin D. Roosevelt:
1) Runner-up for Vice-President in 1920, with 127 votes out of 531
2) Elected President in 1932, with 472 votes out of 531
3) Elected President in 1936, with 523 votes out of 531
4) Elected President in 1940, with 449 votes out of 531
5) Elected President in 1944, with 432 votes out of 531 (and then died in April 1945)

Richard M. Nixon
1) Elected Vice-President in 1952, with 442 votes out of 531
2) Elected Vice-President in 1956, with 457 votes out of 531
3) Runner-up for President in 1960, with 219 votes out of 537
4) Elected President in 1968, with 301 votes out of 538
5) Elected President in 1972, with 520 votes out of 538 (and then resigned in August 1974)

Walter "Fritz" Mondale:
1) Elected Vice-President in 1976, with 297 votes out of 538
2) Runner-up for Vice-President in 1980, with 49 votes out of 538
3) Runner-up for President in 1984, with 13 votes out of 538

Ronald Reagan:
1) Got 1 electoral college vote for President in 1976, from a "faithless elector" pledged to outgoing president Gerald Ford
2) Elected President in 1980, with 489 votes out of 538
3) Elected President in 1984, with 525 votes out of 538

George HW Bush:
1) Elected Vice-President in 1980, with 489 votes out of 538
2) Elected Vice-President in 1984, with 525 votes out of 538
3) Elected President in 1988, with 426 votes out of 538
4) Runner-up for President in 1992, with 168 out of 538 votes

Al Gore:
1) Elected Vice-President in 1992, with 370 out of 538 votes
2) Elected Vice-President in 1996, with 379 votes out of 538
3) Runner-up for President in 2000, with 266 votes out of 528 (despite winning the popular vote)

Comments

( 7 comments — Leave a comment )
pnh
Sep. 27th, 2006 09:56 am (UTC)
That's a really tough question. I was able to remember twelve, all of them three-time official nominees for President or Vice-President; I missed Washington, Jay, George Clinton, Burr, Pinckney, King, John Quincy Adams, Van Buren, and Reagan. And I'm apalled that I forgot about Thomas Andrew Hendricks. I used to know this stuff.

nwhyte
Sep. 27th, 2006 10:43 am (UTC)
Yeah, poor old Hendricks: successful on the third attempt, and then dies after only a few months in office!
applez
Sep. 27th, 2006 02:49 pm (UTC)
Too bad it was the wrong George Clinton</b>. :-)
pgmcc
Sep. 27th, 2006 04:19 pm (UTC)
You were right.

It's a question I would never think of asking.
kalimac
Oct. 2nd, 2006 02:12 pm (UTC)
A couple historical notes:

1) C.C. Pinckney, 1800: he was officially, not just effectively, Adams's running mate (as far as the Federalist Party was concerned; such matters had no legal standing yet, even apart from the fact that the 12th Amendment had not yet been passed). Note that he received 64 votes and Adams had 65. The one omitted vote was the result of deliberate planning by the Federalists, who had thought ahead and wished to avoid, should they win, the tie that plagued Jefferson and Burr.

2) Thomas A. Hendricks, 1872: Hendricks had had some considerable support in the Democratic party for the presidential nomination; thus when Greeley's death released the electors from their pledge, many reverted to him. Logically the choice should have been Greeley's running mate, B. Gratz Brown, but he received fewer electoral votes than Hendricks.
nwhyte
Oct. 2nd, 2006 04:00 pm (UTC)
Logically the choice should have been Greeley's running mate, B. Gratz Brown

I don't really see that that follows. It was an unprecedented situation, which only came even slightly close to being repeated in 1912 when the sitting vice-president died the week before the election. In such a circumstance the party machinery would be entitled to make whatever choice it wanted. Of course, these days it would normally be the vice-presidential candidate but I can imagine circumstances where that didn't happen.

Fletcher Knebel's 1972 novel, Dark Horse, deals with just such an event - presidential candidate dies, comparative unknown chosen to replace him with the consent of the running-mate.
kalimac
Oct. 2nd, 2006 08:51 pm (UTC)
I didn't say the inevitable person or the required person, just the logical person. After all, if Greeley had won the election and then died after the electoral votes had been cast, Brown would have become President.

In more recent years, if the candidate died at this point, the National Committee would meet and pick a new candidate, who in this case might have been Brown or might not have been. That's what the Republicans did in 1912 when their vice-presidential candidate died.
( 7 comments — Leave a comment )

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