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Fury From The Deep

This was occasional soundtrack while driving from Belgium to Ireland (in between various favourite music CDs). Perhaps it was not the ideal story with which to introduce my wife to the delights of the Troughton Era. It was not long before she started to mime the evil mutant seaweed, causing me some slight distraction and no doubt alarming passing drivers who saw her doing it. She also developed an animus against Victoria ("She's so wet!") from a very early stage in the plot, and started making "bang bang" gestures at the stereo speakers every time Deborah Watling's voice was heard. The punchline - that the evil mutant seaweed is killed off precisely by Victoria's screaming - made her incoherent with laughter. I do have the DVD of Tomb of the Cybermen with us, but persuading her to watch it may be a tough sell.

However I found it grew on me. There was a lot of padding (helicopters for the sake of helicopters, for instance), and the whole plot would barely have filled 45 minutes of New Who. But it picked up once birdsflying arrived to sort things out. I've written about dodgy accents in this story before, but even Van Lutyens started sounding more Dutch (or at least less like anything else) as the story went on. And it's a pleasant novelty to have a Who story in which everyone survives.

Victoria's departure - the Victoria/Jamie relationship was an opportunity never taken up by the programme's writers (or, interestingly, by fanfic writers). Jamie clearly fancies her rotten in The Power of the Daleks, and at the end of the first episode of The Ice Warriors he is trying to persuade her to wear the more revealing fashions of the locals (when their conversation is interrupted by the waking monster). But nothing more seems to have ever been made of it. NB that the next two female companions (Zoe and Liz Shaw) were both brainy. Then back to screaming, with Jo Grant.

As Anne said as the title music faded at the end, "So the evil seaweed menace that was threatening to take over the world was defeated by a few loud noises? Not awfully threatening then, was it?"

Comments

( 11 comments — Leave a comment )
alese
Jul. 31st, 2006 08:35 am (UTC)
I've never been exposed to any Dr. Who in any form, but had a dream about Daleks last week, I suspect on account of your livejournal. I still don't know who they are (though I'm sure this could be easily remedied with any sort of google search.)
nwhyte
Jul. 31st, 2006 09:29 am (UTC)
Indeed! They look like this.
alese
Jul. 31st, 2006 09:35 am (UTC)
That's fascinating. They were more Scottish than R2D2 in my dream. Thank you for the link. Maybe eventually I'll work my way up to actually watching some Dr. Who.
tanngrisnir
Jul. 31st, 2006 09:33 am (UTC)
Jamie clearly fancies her rotten in The Power of the Daleks

ITYM Evil of the Daleks.

They couldn't really do much with a relationship then; TV was a lot more prim then than now, and there would have been mutterings about hanky-panky in the Tardis. There was often a sort of subtext of romantic attachment, though: Ian and Barbara, Ben and Polly, Jamie and Victoria (more so than with Zoe), Mike Yates and Jo Grant (very subtle and undeveloped, that one).

I am not at all sure how well Fury would work as a photonovel/soundtrack, but on screen it was very enjoyable. Some of us were still talking about how good it was in the 70s. The helicopter stuff did not come across as padding at the time: helicopters were not everyday things, and TV drama was so often studio-bound.

One striking thing about Fury was the arrival of the Tardis: it materialised in mid-air and slowly lowered itself to the surface of the sea. The Doctor, Jamie and Victoria had to row to the shore. The final shot of Victoria on the beach on the Tardis monitor as they take off was very poignant.
loveandgarbage
Jul. 31st, 2006 09:38 am (UTC)
I wasn't born on broadcast, but the surviving clips of Oak and Quill seem as scary as 60s Doctor Who seems to get. It's also a pretty good Target novelisation by Victor Pemberton.

My exposure to most of the 60s Who was through Target. It's been great fun in recent years with the cds of BBC missing episodes, hearing stories I'd previously screened only in my head.

And Nicholas thanks for posting these reviews. They've made really interesting reading.
tanngrisnir
Jul. 31st, 2006 10:34 am (UTC)
Bit of trivia: as far as I know, Victor Pemberton is the only person who has at different times: written a Doctor Who story, been a member of the production team, and appeared on-screen in a story.

Oak and Quill were pretty scary, yes. ;o)
nwhyte
Jul. 31st, 2006 10:55 am (UTC)
Yeah, I was a real Target addict, but must have stopped reading them before most of the Troughton stories were published.
nwhyte
Jul. 31st, 2006 10:53 am (UTC)
ITYM Evil of the Daleks.

Yes, of course!

They couldn't really do much with a relationship then; TV was a lot more prim then than now, and there would have been mutterings about hanky-panky in the Tardis. There was often a sort of subtext of romantic attachment, though: Ian and Barbara, Ben and Polly, Jamie and Victoria (more so than with Zoe), Mike Yates and Jo Grant (very subtle and undeveloped, that one).

I appreciate that it was basically a kid's show, and so romantic attachments could last for only one story - usually ending with that character leaving, though sometimes a more interesting unrequited love theme (Barbara and the Thal bloke, for instance, or Jo and the young king of Peladon).

What does surprise me is that fanfic writers haven't picked up on Jamie/Victoria, given the more unlikely combinations that they do pick up on. Maybe it's, somehow, too easy?

I am not at all sure how well Fury would work as a photonovel/soundtrack, but on screen it was very enjoyable.

Alas, broadcast just before my first birthday, so I guess I'll never know...
tanngrisnir
Jul. 31st, 2006 11:15 am (UTC)
It was never really a kids' show, more a family show aimed at getting adults and kids watching. Because of that, you wouldn't really get overt romance (since kids didn't like it). In those days, it was very unusual for any sort of adventure series to feature an ongoing romantic relationship. Kirk getting a new woman each week was typical, not exceptional. ;o)

I suppose the Jamie/Victoria thing is a bit obvious, plus a lot of fans haven't seen the originals, I suppose.

It is interesting to speculate on things like: what would have happened had Barbara stayed on Skaro with Ganatus? I wonder if the Thals rebuilt their society and Ganatus went on to write a series of asventures based on his meeting with this woman from the stars... ;o)
nwhyte
Jul. 31st, 2006 05:24 pm (UTC)
I found myself more fascinated by Dyoni, played by an actress who had a successful career in Hammer horror films!
tanngrisnir
Jul. 31st, 2006 05:33 pm (UTC)
Yes, she did crop up in a few of them, didn't she?

I'm always struck by Temmosus, who was much better known to most of us then as the Sheriff of Nottingham, to Richard Greene's (definitive) Robin Hood.
( 11 comments — Leave a comment )

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