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The James Tait Black Memorial Prize

Having hugely enjoyed The Folding Star, it occurred to me that I didn't know much about the one major award that it won, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Looking at the list of winners (there have been 100 awards, to 102 books), I realised I had read more than I knew. How many have you read? (You can sign into the poll using Facebook or Twitter IDs, maybe even Google for all I know.)

Poll #2041557 The James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction

Which of the winners have you read?

1919: Hugh Walpole, The Secret City
1(0.3%)
1920: D. H. Lawrence, The Lost Girl
2(0.5%)
1921: Walter de la Mare, Memoirs of a Midget
2(0.5%)
1922: David Garnett, Lady into Fox
4(1.0%)
1923: Arnold Bennett, Riceyman Steps
0(0.0%)
1924: E. M. Forster, A Passage to India
20(5.1%)
1925: Liam O'Flaherty, The Informer
1(0.3%)
1926: Radclyffe Hall, Adam's Breed
1(0.3%)
1927: Francis Brett Young, Portrait of Clare
0(0.0%)
1928: Siegfried Sassoon, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man
8(2.0%)
1929: J. B. Priestley, The Good Companions
3(0.8%)
1930: E. H. Young, Miss Mole
1(0.3%)
1931: Kate O'Brien, Without My Cloak
2(0.5%)
1932: Helen de Guerry Simpson, Boomerang
0(0.0%)
1933: A. G. Macdonell, England, Their England
4(1.0%)
1934: Robert Graves, I, Claudius
25(6.4%)
1934: Robert Graves, Claudius the God
23(5.9%)
1935: L. H. Myers, The Root and the Flower
0(0.0%)
1936: Winifred Holtby, South Riding
9(2.3%)
1937: Neil M. Gunn, Highland River
0(0.0%)
1938: C. S. Forester, A Ship of the Line
11(2.8%)
1938: C. S. Forester, Flying Colours
11(2.8%)
1939: Aldous Huxley, After Many a Summer Dies the Swan
3(0.8%)
1940: Charles Morgan, The Voyage
0(0.0%)
1941: Joyce Cary, A House of Children
0(0.0%)
1942: Arthur Waley, Translation of Monkey by Wu Cheng'en
4(1.0%)
1943: Mary Lavin, Tales from Bective Bridge
0(0.0%)
1944: Forrest Reid, Young Tom
0(0.0%)
1945: L. A. G. Strong, Travellers
0(0.0%)
1946: Oliver Onions, Poor Man's Tapestry
0(0.0%)
1947: L. P. Hartley, Eustace and Hilda
5(1.3%)
1948: Graham Greene, The Heart of the Matter
9(2.3%)
1949: Emma Smith, The Far Cry
1(0.3%)
1950: Robert Henriques, Through the Valley
0(0.0%)
1951: Chapman Mortimer, Father Goose
0(0.0%)
1952: Evelyn Waugh, Men at Arms
11(2.8%)
1953: Margaret Kennedy, Troy Chimneys
3(0.8%)
1954: C. P. Snow, The New Men and The Masters
3(0.8%)
1955: Ivy Compton-Burnett, Mother and Son
1(0.3%)
1956: Rose Macaulay, The Towers of Trebizond
10(2.6%)
1957: Anthony Powell, At Lady Molly's
3(0.8%)
1958: Angus Wilson, The Middle Age of Mrs. Eliot
0(0.0%)
1959: Morris West, The Devil's Advocate
4(1.0%)
1960: Rex Warner, Imperial Caesar
0(0.0%)
1961: Jennifer Dawson, The Ha-Ha
1(0.3%)
1962: Ronald Hardy, Act of Destruction
0(0.0%)
1963: Gerda Charles, A Slanting Light
0(0.0%)
1964: Frank Tuohy, The Ice Saints
0(0.0%)
1965: Muriel Spark, The Mandelbaum Gate
5(1.3%)
1966: Christine Brooke-Rose, Such
0(0.0%)
1966: Aidan Higgins, Langrishe, Go Down
0(0.0%)
1967: Margaret Drabble, Jerusalem the Golden
6(1.5%)
1968: Maggie Ross, The Gasteropod
0(0.0%)
1969: Elizabeth Bowen, Eva Trout
0(0.0%)
1970: Lily Powell, The Bird of Paradise
0(0.0%)
1971: Nadine Gordimer, A Guest of Honour
1(0.3%)
1972: John Berger, G
1(0.3%)
1973: Iris Murdoch, The Black Prince
2(0.5%)
1974: Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur: or, The Prince of Darkness
2(0.5%)
1975: Brian Moore, The Great Victorian Collection
0(0.0%)
1976: John Banville, Doctor Copernicus
3(0.8%)
1977: John le Carré, The Honourable Schoolboy
13(3.3%)
1978: Maurice Gee, Plumb
0(0.0%)
1979: William Golding, Darkness Visible
3(0.8%)
1980: J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians
0(0.0%)
1981: Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
9(2.3%)
1981: Paul Theroux, The Mosquito Coast
7(1.8%)
1982: Bruce Chatwin, On The Black Hill
9(2.3%)
1983: Jonathan Keates, Allegro Postillions
0(0.0%)
1984: J. G. Ballard, Empire of the Sun
15(3.8%)
1984: Angela Carter, Nights at the Circus
16(4.1%)
1985: Robert Edric, Winter Garden
0(0.0%)
1986: Jenny Joseph, Persephone
0(0.0%)
1987: George Mackay Brown, The Golden Bird: Two Orkney Stories
0(0.0%)
1988: Piers Paul Read, A Season in the West
0(0.0%)
1989: James Kelman, A Disaffection
1(0.3%)
1990: William Boyd, Brazzaville Beach
4(1.0%)
1991: Iain Sinclair, Downriver
1(0.3%)
1992: Rose Tremain, Sacred Country
4(1.0%)
1993: Caryl Phillips, Crossing the River
0(0.0%)
1994: Alan Hollinghurst, The Folding Star
4(1.0%)
1995: Christopher Priest, The Prestige
21(5.4%)
1996: Graham Swift, Last Orders
7(1.8%)
1996: Alice Thompson, Justine
0(0.0%)
1997: Andrew Miller, Ingenious Pain
0(0.0%)
1998: Beryl Bainbridge, Master Georgie
4(1.0%)
1999: Timothy Mo, Renegade, or Halo2
0(0.0%)
2000: Zadie Smith, White Teeth
17(4.3%)
2001: Sid Smith, Something Like a House
0(0.0%)
2002: Jonathan Franzen, The Corrections
10(2.6%)
2003: Andrew O'Hagan, Personality
0(0.0%)
2004: David Peace, GB84
1(0.3%)
2005: Ian McEwan, Saturday
11(2.8%)
2006: Cormac McCarthy, The Road
14(3.6%)
2007: Rosalind Belben, Our Horses in Egypt
0(0.0%)
2008: Sebastian Barry, The Secret Scripture
1(0.3%)
2009: A. S. Byatt, The Children's Book
12(3.1%)
2010: Tatjana Soli, The Lotus Eaters
0(0.0%)
2011: Padgett Powell, You and I
0(0.0%)
2012: Alan Warner, The Deadman's Pedal
0(0.0%)
2013: Jim Crace, Harvest
1(0.3%)
2014: Zia Haider Rahman, In the Light of What We Know
0(0.0%)


I've read CLAVDIVS, Men at Arms, The New Men, The Masters, Doctor Copernicus, Midnight's Children, Empire of the Sun, The Folding Star, The Prestige, The Corrections and The Road, and liked them all except The Corrections. Further recommendations welcome in comments.

Comments

( 17 comments — Leave a comment )
mizkit
Apr. 6th, 2016 11:18 am (UTC)
I thought i was going to get through with a perfect zero, but I've read THE PRESTIGE. :)
rmc28
Apr. 8th, 2016 08:31 pm (UTC)
Re:
I've read The Prestige, and about half of White Teeth, and I didn't really like either.
filigree10
Apr. 6th, 2016 12:07 pm (UTC)
The ones I read were mostly so long ago that I don't remember them very well. The only one I've read recently is The Children's Book by AS Byatt. If you've read and enjoyed Possession then I'd strongly recommend this one too. It follows a family who are involved in the Arts and Crafts movement through Edwardian times and into World War I. I think a lot of the characters are loosely based on real people but I'm not familiar enough with the period to recognise the inspirations. The whole background is very rich with the Victoria and Albert Museum, ceramics, women doctors, women in Cambridge, and World War I poetry all contributing to the plot.
bopeepsheep
Apr. 6th, 2016 08:40 pm (UTC)
Apart from the real person walk-ons (Barrie, Wilde, Brooke etc.) there are definitely allusions to E Nesbit and Kenneth Grahame, plus a couple of not-famous-now members of that sort of Fabian/literary circle. There's a fair amount of Beatrice and Sidney Webb in the main characters. I think HG Wells is in there, with his somewhat complicated love life, but it's a while since I read it.
huskyteer
Apr. 6th, 2016 12:08 pm (UTC)
This is one of those annoying lists that makes me go "but I've read loads of other books by that author, can't I count those?"

I should think if you enjoyed Empire of the Sun and Men at Arms, you would probably enjoy Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man too.

So far I have read an earlier book than anyone else, whoo!
slemslempike
Apr. 6th, 2016 12:10 pm (UTC)
Although two of those I only *think* I've read - I defintiely own them, and I've definitely started them, but no idea if they were finished or not.
coth
Apr. 6th, 2016 12:47 pm (UTC)
Read several off my parents' and grandparents' bookshelves in my teens and remember almost nothing about them. Several more trying to keep up with the Booker Prize in the Seventies that I was too young to get the point of even when I enjoyed them. I've read other books by quite a number of those authors though, and in general I would say that would be a good list of books to read.
coth
Apr. 6th, 2016 12:49 pm (UTC)
Oh, and Chris tells an anecdote about being told he was getting the prize to the effect (if fallible memory serves) that the Prize Administrator rung him up and told him The Affirmation should have had it, so he was giving it for The Prestige even though he hadn't read it at that point. Chris tells it better, as well as no doubt more accurately.
inulro
Apr. 6th, 2016 01:11 pm (UTC)
I just finished The Prestige. My verdict is not trashy enough to be exciting nor difficult enough to be interesting.

I did like The Children's Book and while I wouldn't say I enjoyed Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, I learned a lot from it and I warmed a lot more to Sassoon than I did to most of his contemporaries (it was on the syllabus of my World War I lit class at uni).
liadnan
Apr. 6th, 2016 02:00 pm (UTC)
The Towers of Trebizond is one of my favourite novels, across all genres.

Heart of the Matter is typical Greene - not his best but a good example of his stuff.
saare_snowqueen
Apr. 6th, 2016 07:50 pm (UTC)
I liked that as well. Also I seem to be the only person to have read the Walter de la Mare from 1924. The product of one desperate summer when I read every de la Mare in the library.
girfan
Apr. 6th, 2016 04:14 pm (UTC)
I've read 7 on that list.


A few of the authors-I've read other books by them, but not the one on the list.

trepkos
Apr. 6th, 2016 06:34 pm (UTC)
I am deeply shamed! In my defence, I may have read a couple more and forgotten ... I loved Midnight's Children.
bohemiancoast
Apr. 6th, 2016 10:02 pm (UTC)
White Teeth was startlingly good at the time but I bet it's aged poorly. I really liked Last Orders but thought it a little slight for all the awards it won (this is something that I found quite often with mainstream novels of the 80s and 90s; I'd get to the end and think 'is that it?'). Nights at the Circus is really fantastic and I'm surprised you haven't read it.
makyo
Apr. 7th, 2016 10:15 am (UTC)
I've read three: I, Claudius, Claudius the God and The Prestige. I've also read other books by some of the authors on the list, in particular Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh, Two Cultures by C P Snow (and also his lengthy introduction to G H Hardy's A Mathematician's Apology), The Spy Who Came In From The Cold by John le Carré and The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter. I also once read at least some of Xorandor by Christine Brooke-Rose. My sister was named after one of the central characters in Hugh Walpole's Herries Chronicles, which neither she nor I have read.
coth
Apr. 9th, 2016 10:32 am (UTC)
I remember the Herries chronicles really fondly, and have started to pick it up again with a view to rereading. But I don't think I read much other Walpole.
qatsi
Apr. 7th, 2016 09:26 pm (UTC)
TBH, I wouldn't recommend The Honourable Schoolboy unless you have read a few other le Carrés first.
( 17 comments — Leave a comment )

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