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Maisie Williams' Ashildr didn't turn out to be Susan as I had once hoped; she did turn out to be a very interesting character in her own right, whose future and past histories are now open to all kinds of speculation. I had high hopes for this collection of novellas, since James Goss and Justin Richards, on form, are the best regular Who writers for print, and Jenny Colgan (here adopting a Banksian middle initial as Jenny T. Colgan) is one of the most visible of the big name writers who have been brought in of late - a generally successful initiative.

And I wasn't disappointed. Goss in particular inserts Ashildr into the Thousand and One Nights,in a story that both respects the original tradition of nested and linked narratives, but also throws in some gender subversion. Colgan's story of the Black Death is surprisingly bleak. Llewellyn mashes up Columbus and the Hunger Games. Richards wraps it all up at the end. It's a good collection, perhaps aimed at a more mature readership than is immediately apparent. Let's hope for more.

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makyo
Feb. 22nd, 2016 09:24 pm (UTC)
Maisie Williams' Ashildr didn't turn out to be Susan as I had once hoped
I still rather like the explanation provided in Lungbarrow: [spoilers, sweetie]Susan is the Other's granddaughter, not the Doctor's, but she recognises him psychically and calls him "grandfather" because he's a loomed incarnation of the Other.
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