May 20th, 2015

angry

Wisdom from my Internet, by Michael Z. Williamson

Thanks to the Hugo Voter package, we can now read most of the finalists. This one is a collection of thoughts, mostly Tweets and comments to other people's blog posts I think, on the ballot for Best Related Work, where the slates managed to fill all five available slots.

Wisdom from my Internet is a really bad book. I will admit that I disagree with about 90% of Williamson's political statements; but even in the few cases where I don't, his style is just not very funny. More objectively, I've got a quarter of the way through and if there has been any actual reference to SF I have missed it. I prefer my Best Related Works to actually be, well, related. I don't think I will bother with the rest.

How interesting that the author is a mate of the slatemongers, and that it was not recommended by a single contributor to the crowdsourcing exercise (which we are repeatedly told was "100% open" and "democratic"), yet ended up on both slates anyway! It has reinforced my intention to vote "No Award" for this entire category.

This nomination really shows up the bad faith of those behind the slates. For all their complaints about cliques, political messages and works getting nominated which are of poor quality and are't sfnal enough, here they have done exactly what they accuse the imaginary cabal of doing. It is simply shameful.

2015 Hugos: Initial observations | Voting No Award above the slates | How the slate was(n't) crowdsourced | Where the new voters are
Best Novel | Short fiction | Best Related Work | Best Graphic Story | Pro and Fan Artist | Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form), Best Fan Writer, John W. Campbell Award
politics

Links I found interesting for 20-05-2015

buzz

The Jonah Kit, by Ian Watson

I'm sorry to say that I bounced off this 1977 BSFA Award winner pretty thoroughly. The basic scientific hook, imprinting a dead cosmonaut's mind onto the brain of a child, is interesting enough, but the general setting of decaying contemporary civilisation is depressing without being completely convincing; whereas the characters are convincingly nasty unpleasant people who it is difficult to get interested in. I bounced off The Miracle Visitors too; Adam Roberts took me to task for that, but has since deleted his post. Well, I have two more Watsons on the shelf, so we'll see if they can pull me round.