May 20th, 2013

not happy

Nit-picking about the Celtic Otherworld of 1666

If you set a story in a Celtic Otherworld which is co-located with London, your otherworldly Celts are not all that likely to speak Irish; a lost eastern dialect of Welsh is more probable.

If you set a story in 1666, and your viewpoint character does not have access to time-travel, he probably would not be familiar with the concepts of telegraphing, or oxygen.

Just saying, like.
tardis

May Books 10) Final Sacrifice, by Tony Lee and others.

Collapse )Third (and last) in the series of IDW Tenth Doctor comic books that started with Fugitive and continued with Tesseract. Tony Lee's narrative achieves a very happy union with Matthew Dow Smith's art here, and the story arc arc is rounded off dramatically and satisfactorily. The book is rounded out with three stories from the 2010 Doctor Who Annual, which I now realise I hadn't read; they too are very good. NB that the old man in the first story is called Barnaby Edwards...
ireland

May Books 11) The Crocodile by the Door, by Selina Guinness

I'm coming back to Tibradden, to live with Charles again. I've driven down from Belfast with boxes stacked on the back seat; Colin will follow with the rest of his belongings when his term has finished.
Selina was one of my brother's college friends at TCD, and I always vaguely regretted not getting to know her better, and wondered what she ended up doing. Well, she ended up taking on the (small, run-down) family estate in the foothills of the Dublin mountains, and combining the burdens of twenty-first century farming with her academic career and family. This is an extraordinary book about dealing with changes in family and society, beautifully written, lucidly and emotionally told, and with no punches pulled in her own self-examination of dealing with the intricacies of both family commitments and government bureaucracy, in the years of the inflation and bursting of the Irish property bubble. It's brilliant and you should all go and get it. (I see it's just out in paperback as well.)
buzz

May Books 12) “I have an Idea for a Book ...”: The Bibliography of Martin H. Greenberg

The Hugo Voter Pack is out! So I have merrily downloaded all the nominees I hadn't already read (and a few that I had), and started with this from the Best Related Work category.

Unfortunately it's not very interesting.
Dr. Martin H. Greenberg (1941-2011) was the most prolific anthologist and book packager in the world. During his nearly 40-year career in publishing, he created 1,310 anthologies (including 199 single author collections) and more than 950 novels, along with 228 nonfiction books, for a total of almost 2,500 published works. During this time, he commissioned more than 8,350 original short stories and reprinted more than 13,300 short stories (including 807 novels).
This is a list of all of the books he edited, including ebooks, and it will be useful to people who find this sort of thing useful. The authorship attribution is a bit puzzling; there is a short introduction by John Helfers, but no indication that he assembled the rest of the material (indeed he is explicitly given copyright only for the introduction); the very short biographical sketch from which I quote above is listed in the contents page as "Commentary by Martin H. Greenberg" but clearly isn't, as it refers to him in the past tense and is cast in the first person plural, without ever saying who "we" are. I read the three pages of introductory material, but it would be an exaggeration to say that I even skimmed the rest.