February 5th, 2012

tardis

Women who have written for Who

Inspired by beccaelizabeth's question about women writing for Doctor Who on TV, I have spent the weekend looking at the snow outside and assembling this definitive (though no doubt incomplete and imperfect) list.

The TV Whoniverse

Doctor Who 1963-89
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Doctor Who 2005-
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Sarah Jane Adventures
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Torchwood
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K9
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TV Spinoffs
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Books

Target Novelisations
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Virgin New Adventures
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Virgin Missing Adventures
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Eighth Doctor Adventures
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Past Doctor Adventures
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New Series Adventures
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Telos novellas
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Bernice Summerfield novels
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Torchwood novels
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Faction Paradox novels
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Erimem novel
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Short stories
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Spinoff short stories
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Audios

Big Finish main sequence
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Lost Stories
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BF special release
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Companion Chronicles
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Short Trips
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Spinoffs
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Comics

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I am sure that this list has many mistakes; please tell me my omissions and errors in comments.

Edited to add: Thanks to commenters for pointers on Faction Paradox, JR Loflin, JAckie MArshall and LM Myles.
buzz

February Books 1) Cyber Circus, by Kim Lakin-Smith

First of the BSFA nominees for me to read. Lots of intense description of the Circus inmates and their enemies, and some very sensual sex, but I found it quite difficult to follow what was actually going on. I actually found Black Sunday, the companion novella set in Dustbowl Texas, much more approachable and liked it more. I will certainly look out for more from Lakin-Smith in future, though I will be surprised if I rank this top of my BSFA ballot.
plovdiv

February Books 2) The Hare with Amber Eyes, by Edmund de Waal

I didn't know much about this book before I started it, though I vaguely know one of the author's brothers, an expert on the South Caucasus, and know of another, who is an expert on Sudan. It's quite a remarkable story, tracking the history of the Ephrussi family through the fate of a collection of netsuke, including the hare of the title, from France to Austria and back to Japan. The two particularly impressive sections are on the life of the collection's first owner, Charles Ephrussi, who turns up in Renoir paintings and was one of the people that Proust's Charles Swann was based on, and the heart-wrenching story of the destruction of the family household in Vienna after the Nazi take-over, including the chance survival of the netsuke collection when almost all else was lost. But there are also sections covering the life of the author's great-uncle in Japan and how de Waal put the story together in the first place. It's all beautifully written, and de Waal successfully recreates the atmosphere of these lost worlds for the reader.