March 27th, 2011

politics

Delicious LiveJournal Links for 3-27-2011

tardis

March Books 23) Iceberg, by David Banks

I thought this was an excellent Seventh Doctor novel, achieving the rare feat of writing a decent Cybermen story, in this case by the guy who actually played the Cyberleader on screen in the 1980s; set in 2006 and unifying the continuity of the various Cybermen TV stories set in the twentieth century. The Doctor is separated from his usual companions (who are off having the adventure described in Birthright) and teams up with a feisty investigative journalist called Ruby Duvall; if Big Finish are casting around for more characters to revive they could do worse than her.
tardis

March Books 24) Doctor Who Annual 1982

Produced just as Tom Baker was changing to Peter Davison, and featuring Adric as the sole humanoid companion, along with K9 for the earlier stories (this is presumably K9 Mark III, being run in before the Doctor sent him off to Sarah Jane Smith). The first two stories are rather memorable - one has Adric reduced to miniscule size and forced to take part in a war between inhabitants of a world which is actually a carbon atom; the other has the Tardis afflicted by the sort of spatial bending that crops up in both Logopolis and Castrovalva, this annual being published in the gap between the respective broadcasts of the two. As well as anticipating Wikipedia and the GPS, the factoids include a relatively balanced piece on plutonium and nuclear power which is just as relevant thirty years on. The two Fifth Doctor stories at the end aren't especially memorable, and feature head-shots of Davison based on his All Creatures Great and Small character. The art is otherwise pretty good.
torchwood

March Books 25) Ghost Train, by James Goss

One of the two Torchwood audio books just released, both I think by Goss (who I find a tremendously impressive writer) and read by Kai "Rhys Williams" Owen, set in the gap between Torchwood series 2 and 3. Ghost Train is told as a first person narrative by Rhys, who gets sucked into a peculiar alien invasion with added time travel paradoxes, and ends up pilfering from himself. It's slightly retconning to put Rhys, whose great virtue in the TV show was that he was a lightning rod to normality, as the central character in a tale of the creepy unknown, but the story is a brilliant mixture of humour and horror, and Owen is a great reader - his Jack is a little too drawly, but of course he is playing Rhys doing Jack rather than being Jack himself. I hope the other new audiobook, Department X, is as good.
tardis

March Books 26) Beltempest, by Jim Mortimore

An Eighth Doctor Adventure that didn't really grab me - the plot, involving an artificial cosmic doom threatening an entire solar system, very similar to the last book I read in this series, and Mortimore's writing rather undisciplined - I normally like his books and scripts more than I did this one. Poor Sam gets messed around with in mind and body.