Nicholas (nwhyte) wrote,
Nicholas
nwhyte

Language quiz: answer and poll

The language that I posted about last night is Marshallese (Kajin Majol), the indigenous language of the Marshall Islands. The "ri Majol" are therefore the Marshallese people. Congrats to alacsony and akicif.

I cut and pasted the two articles from my source (a PDF of the 25 May edition of Marshall Islands Journal), so the orthography is as used in newspapers. This means that none of the diacritical marks of the standard language have been used: "ri Majol" should strictly be "ri M̧ajōļ", with hooks under the M and l which your browser may not render (mine gets the ļ but not the M̧).

Actually, that's a good excuse for a poll:
Poll #1853358 Marshall Islands orthography

In your browser, does Ā look like A with a horizontal line (macron) over it?

Yes
106(98.1%)
No
2(1.9%)

In your browser, does Ļ look like L with a cedilla (hook) under it?

Yes
97(89.8%)
No
11(10.2%)

In your browser, does M̧ look like M with a cedilla (hook) under it?

Yes
76(72.4%)
No
29(27.6%)

In your browser, does Ņ look like N with a cedilla (hook) under it?

Yes
96(88.9%)
No
12(11.1%)

In your browser, does N̄ look like N with a horizontal line (macron) over/through it?

Yes
78(74.3%)
No
27(25.7%)

In your browser, does O̧ look like O with a cedilla (hook) under it?

Yes
79(76.0%)
No
25(24.0%)

In your browser, does Ō look like O with a horizontal line (macron) over it?

Yes
107(99.1%)
No
1(0.9%)

In your browser, does Ū look like U with a horizontal line (macron) over it?

Yes
107(99.1%)
No
1(0.9%)

(Sorry, burkesworks, no ampersands.)
Tags: alphabets
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