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Comments on my not totally effusive post on Good Omens have revealed that my tastes are not the same as everyone's (I know, imagine my surprise, etc). There is of course only one possible way to establish definitively which are the best novels by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, and that is to conduct a poll. So without further ado:

Which is your favourite novel by Terry Pratchett?

The Carpet People
0(0.0%)
The Dark Side of the Sun
0(0.0%)
Strata
0(0.0%)
The Colour of Magic
5(8.8%)
The Light Fantastic
0(0.0%)
Equal Rites
0(0.0%)
Mort
2(3.5%)
Truckers
0(0.0%)
Sourcery
0(0.0%)
Wyrd Sisters
1(1.8%)
Pyramids
0(0.0%)
Guards! Guards!
2(3.5%)
Good Omens (with Neil Gaiman)
6(10.5%)
Diggers
0(0.0%)
Wings
0(0.0%)
Eric
0(0.0%)
Moving Pictures
2(3.5%)
Reaper Man
0(0.0%)
Witches Abroad
2(3.5%)
Only You Can Save Mankind
1(1.8%)
Small Gods
5(8.8%)
Lords and Ladies
1(1.8%)
Johnny and the Dead
0(0.0%)
Men at Arms
0(0.0%)
Soul Music
0(0.0%)
Interesting Times
1(1.8%)
Maskerade
0(0.0%)
Johnny and the Bomb
0(0.0%)
Feet of Clay
2(3.5%)
Hogfather
2(3.5%)
Jingo
2(3.5%)
The Last Continent
0(0.0%)
Carpe Jugulum
1(1.8%)
The Fifth Elephant
0(0.0%)
The Truth
4(7.0%)
Thief of Time
0(0.0%)
The Last Hero
0(0.0%)
The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents
0(0.0%)
Night Watch
8(14.0%)
The Wee Free Men
1(1.8%)
Monstrous Regiment
1(1.8%)
A Hat Full of Sky
0(0.0%)
Going Postal
5(8.8%)
Thud!
1(1.8%)
Wintersmith
0(0.0%)
Making Money
0(0.0%)
Nation
2(3.5%)
Unseen Academicals
0(0.0%)
I Shall Wear Midnight
0(0.0%)

And which is your favourite novel by Neil Gaiman?

Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett)
16(26.7%)
Neverwhere
14(23.3%)
Stardust
4(6.7%)
American Gods
11(18.3%)
Coraline
1(1.7%)
Anansi Boys (2005)
10(16.7%)
Odd and the Frost Giants (2008)
0(0.0%)
The Graveyard Book (2008)
4(6.7%)
Feel free to justify your choice, or query others', below.

Comments

( 21 comments — Leave a comment )
nwhyte
Dec. 8th, 2010 10:16 am (UTC)
My own choices: Small Gods to me captures Pratchett's humanism and humanity incredibly well, and is also as usual very funny; Anansi Boys is the only one of Gaiman's mature novels that didn't feel to me like an attempt to redo Sandman in a different medium.
andrewducker
Dec. 8th, 2010 10:40 am (UTC)
Small Gods is winning so far (and I ticked it as my favourite). I think you're right about it capturing something essential to Pratchett.

I liked Anansi Boys the most out of Gaiman's mainstream novels, but Stardust felt magical to me in a way none of his other books have. Generally, I'm not that impressed by Gaiman as a novellist, I vastly prefer his comics and short story work.
etherealfionna
Dec. 8th, 2010 10:47 am (UTC)
I'm not that impressed by Gaiman as a novellist, I vastly prefer his comics and short story work

Right. I love his imagination, but the prose often ends up clunky and disappointing.
andrewducker
Dec. 8th, 2010 10:48 am (UTC)
Also the structure. So many of his novels are based around the same structure, whereas his short stories will leap off in unexpected and unusual directions. It's like he believes that novels all have to have a particular shape.
raycun
Dec. 8th, 2010 10:32 am (UTC)
I stopped reading Pratchett when they all started blending into one book that I half-thought I'd read before, so I can't really answer that first one. It's not that they're bad, but I see no point in reading further. Which also makes it difficult to answer the poll.
All of the Gaiman books are flawed, in different ways, but Anansi Boys I couldn't read past the first few pages. It was just awful. In general, he seems to be happy with being increasingly Gaimanesque, and it strikes me as lazy and self-satisfied.

Perhaps that's why I like Good Omens most - collaborating on a novel might not have shaken them out of their comfort zones, but at least the overlap of those zones was more interesting. (I didn't vote for it though, since I've already said that, instead voting for the best x-only books)
(Deleted comment)
deannawol
Dec. 8th, 2010 12:05 pm (UTC)
I think with Good Omens fanfic, it's down to the character interactions between them in the book. There is a good interplay between them and it makes for a starting point from which to write fanfic. It's kind of like the old kit kat ad with the angel and demon taking a break from their hectic lives for a spot of tiffin (or in this case tea).
abigail_n
Dec. 8th, 2010 10:46 am (UTC)
Though I've read all of Gaiman's novels I've never been a huge fan of his (and anyway his best work is Sandman, which is not a novel) so the choice was an easy one - Anansi Boys demonstrates all his strengths and none of his weaknesses. It's funny and imaginative without being twee (Coraline, The Graveyard Book), tightly plotted without being predictable (Stardust, Neverwhere). I have a soft spot for American Gods, for the sheer audacity of its sprawl, but Anansi Boys takes the same material and makes a genuinely good book out of it.

Pratchett, though I've cooled on him in the last decade, is a harder question. I picked Feet of Clay - to my mind the novel that captures him at the height of his powers, and perfectly combines the setting of Ankh-Morpork, the character of Sam Vimes and the other watchmen, and the theme of social justice seen through a fantastic lens. All of these elements would eventually go off the boil in later books, but in Feet of Clay they all work, and combine to make one of Pratchett's most satisfying novels. But I could have just as easily picked The Wee Free Men, the most recent Pratchett novel that I've unreservedly loved, or The Truth, which recaptures a lot of the heydey of early Watch novels, or Wyrd Sisters, my first Discworld love, or Small Gods, which is often, to its detriment, treated like the "important" Discworld novel but is still a surprisingly thoughtful handling of religion, or The Carpet People, which is brief and silly but almost perfectly-formed. It's easy to forget, given how milquetoast a lot of his stuff is today, how much Pratchett has done and how original and important a lot of it was when he was doing it - thanks for reminding me.
geekette8
Dec. 8th, 2010 11:22 am (UTC)
Good Omens is my favourite of either of them as I mentioned on your previous post. (I also like Aziraphale / Crowley fic, as another commenter pointed out, but my love of Good Omens far pre-dates my love of fanfic in general and slash in particular.)

Excluding Good Omens, my favourite Pratchett is really difficult to pick. I think in the end I'd go for Only You Can Save Mankind.

For Gaiman, Neverwhere.
girfan
Dec. 8th, 2010 11:43 am (UTC)
I'm not a fan of Pratchett so said Good Omens, though I did enjoy the television version of Hogfather a lot 9never read the book).


As a Gaiman fan, American Gods is the best novel, though others are quite good. One has to realise that Coraline, The Graveyard Book and Odd and the Frost Giants are all written for children/young adults so are in a different catagory, IMHO.

sugarimp
Dec. 8th, 2010 11:49 am (UTC)
I loved Neverwhere... nothing particularly special about it, mind you. It was just a good read to me.

As for Pratchett, oops, I meant to choose The Truth, not Going Postal.
matgb
Dec. 8th, 2010 03:17 pm (UTC)
As the only vote current for The Truth, worth noting you can change your vote the poll number link at the top takes you to a page with a change your vote link.

I was torn between postal and truth though, so it matters not.
sugarimp
Dec. 8th, 2010 04:30 pm (UTC)
Just did it, thanks! Going Postal would have been my second choice. So we have the same taste, haha.
deannawol
Dec. 8th, 2010 12:01 pm (UTC)
My choices: Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett and Good Omens by both

I love the energy that goes with the Wee Free Men and it's an excellent example of use of colloqualism and accent in written form. But for Gaimen, I have to say that I'm not a fan. I just can't get into his books. I've seen the Stardust and Neverwhere movies but I was left a little unimpressed. Especially with Neverwhere.

My housemate likes his books so we have a fair number of them around the house but I just can't make myself pick them up to reexamine them.
inulro
Dec. 8th, 2010 12:26 pm (UTC)
I'm undecided which Pratchett is my favourite, and I haven't read all of them. I went off him for a while, but then I picked up Thud from the library and loved that so I'm willing to give more of his recent stuff a try.

The first two I read were Pyramids and Guards, Guards and I laughed out loud all the way through both. Since then it's been a law of diminishing returns for me.

I thought the wizards were funny for a while, but that joke wore really thin. I loathe anything to do with Nanny Ogg and Granny Weatherwax - I don't think I ever thought they were amusing. My loyalty lies with the Watch books - I can think of good reasons why I should dislike some of the Watch characters, but I like them all.
rosefox
Dec. 8th, 2010 07:44 pm (UTC)
I had a really, really hard time choosing between Pyramids and Moving Pictures. If I could give each one half a vote, I would.
andrewducker
Dec. 8th, 2010 02:10 pm (UTC)
Oh, and I have a massive soft spot for Strata, which showed a different side of Terry, and one I'd have liked to see more of, before he got sucked into The Discworld.
tchernabyelo
Dec. 8th, 2010 03:40 pm (UTC)
Astonished by the love for Good Omens, which I was very disappointed by. But I m not a great Pratchett fan (I voted for The Colour Of Magic, mostly for its first section in which he nails Fritz Lieber beautifully; he was more successful as a pastichist, IMHO, than as his own writer but I realise I am in a tiny minority on that). Gaiman, I went for the beautiful Stardust; I like Neverwhere as well (which I seem to have lost in novel form, somehow, but have in graphic novel and have seen in TV form). American Gods has some excelletn parts but overall is too meandering and unstructured, courtesy of its too-passive MC, and Anansi Boys didn't entirely work for me (in particular with Daisy, who felt utterly cardboard). I honestly feel Gaiman is a better comics than prose writer.
bopeepsheep
Dec. 8th, 2010 03:49 pm (UTC)
I much prefer NG's short stories to his long ones.
niamh_sage
Dec. 8th, 2010 04:15 pm (UTC)
I voted for Night Watch and American Gods. I love Good Omens but it's not my favourite of either. Also, I should say that my actual favourite of anything Neil Gaiman's ever done is the Sandman series. I was very disappointed by Anansi Boys and couldn't understand the hype it got.

I'm fond of all of Terry Pratchett's work, except perhaps for Unseen Academicals. I'm not sure why that one in particular except that I'm not really interested in football, so probably missed half of the references which usually make his reading entertaining to me. The Tiffany Aching books are my favourite sequence - I Shall Wear Midnight actually made me cry, which has never happened with a Pratchett book.

amphibian8
Dec. 9th, 2010 05:57 pm (UTC)
I love Gaiman's books. I picked "Neverwhere", but I could easily have gone with the "Graveyard Book". I like that "Neverwhere" is set in London which might be a drawback to some of his American readers, but London becomes another character in the book-giving it more body.

Pratchett's books tend to amuse me, but don't stay in mind too long. However, "The Colour of Magic" did stick with me and so I chose that book. I suppose as it is the first of the Discworld novels had something to do with its lingering in my mind.
( 21 comments — Leave a comment )

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