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Books I haven't read

I tried this last year, and it proved rather a useful guide to books I might like to read during the year. So, this is the list of unread books on my shelves (excluding, rather arbitrarily, Doctor Who and Shakespeare): which of these have you read?

Poll #1323288 2009 books?

Which of these books have you read?

Life Of Pi, by Yann Martel
0(0.0%)
Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
0(0.0%)
The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
0(0.0%)
The Road, by Cormac McCarthy
0(0.0%)
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, by Dave Eggers
0(0.0%)
The Fountainhead, by Ayn Rand
0(0.0%)
Corrections, by Jonathan Franzen
0(0.0%)
Tess of the D'Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy
0(0.0%)
To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf
0(0.0%)
Reading Lolita in Tehran, by Azar Nafisi
0(0.0%)
As I Lay Dying, by Faulkner William
1(0.7%)
Notre-Dame of Paris [The Hunchback of Notre Dame], by Victor Hugo
0(0.0%)
Far from the Madding Crowd, by Thomas Hardy
0(0.0%)
Quidditch through the ages, by J. K. Rowling
0(0.0%)
Labyrinth, by Kate Mosse
0(0.0%)
Galileo's daughter, by Dava Sobel
0(0.0%)
Making Money, by Terry Pratchett
0(0.0%)
Les Liaisons Dangereuses, by Choderlos de Laclos
0(0.0%)
Survival In Auschwitz, by Primo Levi
0(0.0%)
The Summer Tree, by Guy Gavriel Kay
1(0.7%)
On the Beach, by Nevil Shute
0(0.0%)
Kindred, by Octavia E. Butler
0(0.0%)
The Problems of Philosophy, by Bertrand Russell
1(0.7%)
Heart of the Sea, by Nora Roberts
0(0.0%)
Fleshmarket Close, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Resurrection Men, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
The Naming Of The Dead, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Black and Blue, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
A Question of Blood, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
The Falls, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Njal's Saga, by Leifur Eiricksson
0(0.0%)
Resurrection, by Leo Tolstoy
0(0.0%)
The Road from Coorain, by Jill Ker Conway
0(0.0%)
Dead Souls, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Set in Darkness, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
The go-between, by L. P. Hartley
0(0.0%)
The Book of Jhereg, by Steven Brust
0(0.0%)
Stormbringer, by Michael Moorcock
0(0.0%)
Let It Bleed, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
The Hanging Garden, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Mortal Causes, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Music & silence, by Rose Tremain
0(0.0%)
The Black Book, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Exit Music, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
King Solomon's ring, by Conrad Z. Lorenz
0(0.0%)
On Liberty and Other Essays, by John Stuart Mill
0(0.0%)
Thirteen Steps Down, by Ruth Rendell
0(0.0%)
Rocks of Ages, by Stephen Jay Gould
0(0.0%)
Africa: A Biography of the Continent, by John Reader
0(0.0%)
Star Trek The Next Generation Companion, by Larry Nemecek
1(0.7%)
Toward the End of Time, by John Updike
0(0.0%)
Red Branch, by Morgan Llywelyn
0(0.0%)
Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain, by Maryanne Wolf
0(0.0%)
The Wonderful Adventures of Nils, by Selma Lagerlof
0(0.0%)
Million Open Doors, by John Barnes
0(0.0%)
Dagger Magic, by Katherine Kurtz
0(0.0%)
The Mermaids Singing, by Lisa Carey
0(0.0%)
Misspent Youth, by Peter F. Hamilton
0(0.0%)
The Year's Best Science Fiction Twenty-Second Annual Collection (2005), by Gardner Dozois
0(0.0%)
Beggars Banquet, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Watchman, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
The Year's Best Science Fiction Twenty-Fourth Annual Collection (2007), by Gardner Dozois
0(0.0%)
Fairyland, by Paul McAuley
0(0.0%)
The lost heart of Asia, by Colin Thubron
0(0.0%)
Peeling the Onion, by Gunter Grass
0(0.0%)
Shakespeare's Planet, by Clifford D. Simak
0(0.0%)
Queen City Jazz, by Kathleen Ann Goonan
0(0.0%)
The Portable Greek Historians: The Essence of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, by M. I. Finley
0(0.0%)
Teach Yourself Irish (2003), by Diarmuid O Se
0(0.0%)
Blood Hunt, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
The Devil's Highway, by Luis Alberto Urrea
0(0.0%)
Bleeding Hearts, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
Queen Elizabeth I, by J. E. Neale
0(0.0%)
Back Home, by Michelle Magorian
0(0.0%)
Sunset at Blandings, by P. G. Wodehouse
0(0.0%)
Jennie, by Paul Gallico
0(0.0%)
A History of the Middle East, by Peter Mansfield
1(0.7%)
George's Secret Key to the Universe, by Lucy Hawking and Stephen Hawking
0(0.0%)
Holy Disorders, by Edmund Crispin
0(0.0%)
Cities of salt, by Abd al-Rahman Munif
0(0.0%)
The Godmother's Apprentice, by Elizabeth Ann Scarborough
0(0.0%)
Appleseed, by John Clute
0(0.0%)
White Queen, by Gwyneth Jones
0(0.0%)
When Santa Fell to Earth, by Cornelia Funke
0(0.0%)
The Space Opera Renaissance, by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer
0(0.0%)
The Flowering of New England-1815-1865, by Van Wyck Brooks
0(0.0%)
Elric, by Michael Moorcock
1(0.7%)
The Queen's Bastard, by C.E. Murphy
0(0.0%)
Earth Logic, by Laurie J. Marks
0(0.0%)
Fortunata and Jacinta, by Benito Perez Galdos
0(0.0%)
Teach yourself Irish (1961), by Myles Dillon
0(0.0%)
The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing, by Richard Dawkins
0(0.0%)
Rebus: The Early Years: Knots & Crosses, Hide & Seek, Tooth & Nail, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
White Crow, by Mary Gentle
0(0.0%)
The Great Tradition, by F.R. Leavis
0(0.0%)
Chronicle in Stone, by Ismail Kadare
0(0.0%)
The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Fifth Annual Collection (2008), by Gardner Dozois
0(0.0%)
The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction 2007, by George Mann
0(0.0%)
Constantinople, by Philip Mansel
0(0.0%)
Rebus's Scotland: A Personal Journey, by Ian Rankin
0(0.0%)
The World of Washington Irving, by Van Wyck Brooks
0(0.0%)
Year's Best SF 12 (2007), by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer
0(0.0%)
Twilight Whispers, by Barbara Delinsky
0(0.0%)
The Two Faces of Islam: Saudi Fundamentalism and Its Role in Terrorism, by Stephen Schwartz
0(0.0%)
The Space Race: The Battle to Rule the Heavens, by Deborah Cadbury
0(0.0%)
Seasons of Plenty, by Colin Greenland
0(0.0%)
Speaking in Tongues, by Ian McDonald
0(0.0%)
Can Reindeer Fly?: The Science of Christmas, by Roger Highfield
0(0.0%)
Yearwood, by Paul Hazel
0(0.0%)
Miracle Visitors, by Ian Watson
0(0.0%)
The Prodigal Troll, by Charles Coleman Finlay
0(0.0%)
The provinces of the Roman Empire, from Caesar to Diocletian, by Theodor Mommsen
0(0.0%)
The Wizard Knight, by Gene Wolfe
0(0.0%)
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #4 (1975), by Terry Carr
0(0.0%)
Wandering Star, by J.M.G. Le Clezio
0(0.0%)
Visions of Wonder: The Science Fiction Research Association Reading Anthology, by David G. Hartwell and Milton T. Wolf
0(0.0%)
So Long Been Dreaming: Postcolonial Visions of the Future, by Nalo Hopkinson
0(0.0%)
With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child v. 1, by Keiko Tobe
0(0.0%)
Irish Magic II: The Changeling/ Earthly Magic/ To Recapture the Light/ Bride Price, by Morgan Llywelyn
0(0.0%)
Night Sky Atlas, by Robin Scagell
0(0.0%)
Spectrum: A Science Fiction Anthology: No. 4 (1972), by Kingsley Amis
0(0.0%)
Irish Tales of Terror: Twenty-Two Bewitching Tales of Irish Mystery and Magic, by Peter Haining
0(0.0%)
Western Shore, by Juliet E. McKenna
0(0.0%)
Analog 6 (1969), by John W (editor) Campbell
0(0.0%)
Mother of Plenty, by Colin Greenland
0(0.0%)
Fantasy: The Best of the Year 2007, by Rich Horton
0(0.0%)
Other Edens: No. 1 (1987), by Christopher Evans
0(0.0%)
The Cambridge Historical Encyclopedia of Great Britain and Ireland, by Christopher Haigh
0(0.0%)
The Plot Against Pepys, by James Long
0(0.0%)
Forbidden Acts, by Nancy A. Collins
0(0.0%)
Satires and personal writings, by Jonathan Swift
0(0.0%)
2nd Interzone Anthology (1988), by John Clute
0(0.0%)
The Time Dissolver, by Jerry Sohl
0(0.0%)
Sacred Visions, by Andrew M. Greeley
0(0.0%)
History of the Spanish Inquisition, by Joseph Perez
0(0.0%)
Other Edens: No. 2 (1988), by Christopher Evans
0(0.0%)
The Island, by Armin Greder
0(0.0%)
The Stories of Elizabeth Spencer, by Elizabeth Spencer
0(0.0%)
England's Troubles: Seventeenth-Century English Political Instability in European Context, by Jonathan Scott
0(0.0%)
The Enchanted Isles, by K.C. Flynn
0(0.0%)
Radical Islams Rules: The Worldwide Spread of Extreme Sharia Law, by Paul Marshall
0(0.0%)
Toujours Tingo: Extraordinary Words to Change the Way We See the World, by Adam Jacot de Boinod
0(0.0%)
European Community: The Building of a Union, by John Pinder
0(0.0%)
Hotel Rwanda: Bringing the True Story of an African Hero to Film, by Terry George
0(0.0%)
Half-life of a Zealot, by Swanee Hunt
0(0.0%)
Burghley: William Cecil at the Court of Elizabeth I, by Stephen Alford
0(0.0%)
The Prisoner of Chillon, by James Patrick Kelly
0(0.0%)
Irish tales of terror, by Jim McGarry
0(0.0%)
Representing Autism, by Stuart Murray
0(0.0%)
On the place of Gilbert Chesterton in English letters, by Hilaire Belloc
0(0.0%)
Out of Nowhere, by Gerald Whelan
0(0.0%)
Geschiedenis van Cyprus, by Alain Blondy
0(0.0%)
Soul of the Age: The Life, Mind and World of William Shakespeare, by Jonathan Bate
0(0.0%)
A Viceroy's Vindication? Sir Henry Sidney's Memoir of Service in Ireland, 1556-78
0(0.0%)
Ireland in the Age of the Tudors: The Destruction of Hiberno-Norman Civilization, by R. Dudley Edwards
0(0.0%)
Most Ancient Song, by Kenneth C. Flint
0(0.0%)
Faith in Europe?: The Cardinal's Lectures, by Bob Geldof
0(0.0%)
SIPRI Yearbook 2008
0(0.0%)
Shakespeare Handbook, by Robert Maslen
0(0.0%)
The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser Edited with Critical Notes, by J. C. Smith and E. de Selincourt
0(0.0%)
The Bessarabian Question in Communist Historiography, by Wim P. Van Meurs
0(0.0%)
Laserlicht, by Tais Teng
0(0.0%)
Thunderbirds Bumper Storybook: "The Uninvited", "Brink of Disaster", "Sun Probe", "Atlantic Inferno", by Dave Morris
0(0.0%)
Sarajevo Rose: A Balkan Jewish Notebook, by Stephen Schwartz
0(0.0%)
The Power of Speech: Leadership Speeches, by Graham Watson
0(0.0%)
The Case for Global Democracy: Advocating a United Nations Parliamentary Assembly, by Graham Watson
0(0.0%)
Kushtetuta e UE: Rubikoni i Supranacionales / EU Constitution: The Rubicon of Suprenational, by Blerim Reka
0(0.0%)
The Cyprus Conflict: Looking Ahead, by Ahmet Sözen
0(0.0%)
EU Accession Dynamics And Conflict Resolution: Catalysing Peace Or Consolidating Partition In Cyprus?, by Nathalie Tocci
0(0.0%)
How to Make Good Decisions and be Right All the Time: Solving the Riddle of Right and Wrong, by Iain King
0(0.0%)
How to Make School Make Sense: A Parents' Guide to Helping the Child with Asperger Syndrome, by Clare Lawrence
0(0.0%)
The British Museum Book of Ancient Egypt, by A. Jeffrey Spencer
0(0.0%)
The New Hennessy Book of Irish Fiction , by Dermot Bolger
0(0.0%)

Is there any that you would particularly recommend?

Is there any that you would particularly not recommend?


Comments

( 49 comments — Leave a comment )
Page 1 of 2
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seawasp
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:03 pm (UTC)
For Ayn Rand's work, I would actually not recommend The Fountainhead, even though it contains one of the greatest villains ever invented.

If you want a quick Ayn Rand summary "hit", you read "Anthem", which is very short. If you want the full Ayn Rand thinking in the best fictional form she could manage it, you read Atlas Shrugged. "Fountainhead" lies uncomfortably between the two.
nwhyte
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:39 pm (UTC)
Yeah, it's a question of what is on my shelves at the moment, so I think I'll try The Fountainhead anyway since it has the virtue of availability. Then maybe the others, if I think I can bear it.
shana
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:05 pm (UTC)
The Nora Roberts is the third book in a trilogy. The story can stand alone, I think, but it does have spoilers for the first two books. ['Jewels of the Sun' and 'Tears of the Moon' being the first two.]

I would suggest starting that series with 'Jewels of the Sun'.
nwhyte
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:40 pm (UTC)
My reason for going to #3 is that it is the one set in Ireland! (Unless all three are, in which case I was misinformed.) I doubt if Roberts is really my sort of author anyway.
(no subject) - shana - Dec. 31st, 2008 02:50 pm (UTC) - Expand
raycun
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:31 pm (UTC)
The Road is very bleak. Very, very, very bleak.
The Corrections is very good.
Heartbreaking Work really divides people - I like it, but many hate it.
The Go-Between was surprisingly enjoyable - I expected the time and setting to be more of a barrier to my reading than they were.
On the Beach, by contrast, has a very dated feel.
If you haven't read Elric or Stormbringer yet then you should. If you don't like them, they're very short, and if you do like them... well, there aren't as many Eternal Champion books as Doctor Who books, but possibly enough to keep you going for a week or two.

Life of Pi is stupid. There is no other word for it. Appleseed is too clever by half. Or too clever by six.
nwhyte
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:41 pm (UTC)
The Elric is the Fatasy Masterworks omnibus; but even so, I suspect you are right that it won't take me long!
(no subject) - outerego - Dec. 31st, 2008 04:28 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - jophan - Dec. 31st, 2008 03:10 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - outerego - Dec. 31st, 2008 04:17 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - yiskah - Dec. 31st, 2008 04:49 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - nwhyte - Dec. 31st, 2008 08:20 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - wwhyte - Jan. 1st, 2009 05:07 am (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - wwhyte - Jan. 1st, 2009 05:07 am (UTC) - Expand
inulro
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:46 pm (UTC)
Yes, I've read everything Ian Rankin has written except for Rebus's Scotland. Which I plan to rectify. I started with "Dead Souls", which I think is a good place to start.

I'm undecided on "A Hearbreaking Work...".

I thought Labyrinth was OK (though I got interrupted and had to leave it halfway through for about a month, which probably didn't help), but the follow up (not exactly a sequel) Sepulchre I liked a lot more.

Similarly, The Summer Tree is miles away from being Kay's best work.

I have good intentions towards Scarlet Letter but have not yet managed to crack it.
nickbarnes
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:46 pm (UTC)
I have probably read some of the anthologies, but I can't keep track of which ones.
kcobweb
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:49 pm (UTC)
Out of that list, I'd read Kindred - it's amazing.

Also, I read another book of Lisa Carey's, and liked it - but I don't know much about Mermaids Singing.
malinaldarose
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:50 pm (UTC)
I highly recommend anything by Guy Gavriel Kay, though The Summer Tree is the first book of a trilogy (and also his first published book).

I read The Scarlet Letter in high school, then read it again when I returned to college in my late 30s and found it a much better book for being older.
jophan
Dec. 31st, 2008 03:11 pm (UTC)
From what I've heard other people say, the Fionavar trilogy isn't really worth reading. I love his later books, though.
(no subject) - inulro - Dec. 31st, 2008 03:23 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - bellinghman - Dec. 31st, 2008 03:25 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - malinaldarose - Dec. 31st, 2008 03:39 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - yiskah - Dec. 31st, 2008 04:51 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - malinaldarose - Dec. 31st, 2008 05:58 pm (UTC) - Expand
yea_mon
Dec. 31st, 2008 02:57 pm (UTC)
I haven't gotten the whole way through Year's Best SF12 yet (because of my reading style, not the book). So far it's been good - and that's the first 3 stories: Kress's Nano Comes to Clifford Falls; Bisson's Brother Can You Spare a Dime; and Doctorow's improbable but compelling When Sysadmins Ruled the Earth.

As for Elric, he never was my favorite for some reason - Hawkmoon, Corum and Bastable on the other hand were gripping.

If you do decide to go for The Space Opera Renaissance could you post an opinion? Sounds interesting...
girfan
Dec. 31st, 2008 03:09 pm (UTC)
Why so many unread Rankins? Did someone lend them to you or were they a cheap charity shop find?
nwhyte
Dec. 31st, 2008 08:26 pm (UTC)
I was given one as a thank-you for doing a speech early in the year; I never actually read it, but my wife did, and developed a fascination for them!
redfiona99
Dec. 31st, 2008 03:42 pm (UTC)
I've only read Elric, and well, you know how Catcher in the Rye works better if you're a teenager, I worry that Elric might. But the dragons will still be there and they were the best thing about it. Or the maze. I enjoyed it anyway.

Far From the Madding Crowd put my Mum off Hardy for life, and then did the same to me thirty years later, but I read a much abridged version. My friends's opinions on Tess vary, all of them agree it's well written but half of them want to strangle Tess herself.
outerego
Dec. 31st, 2008 04:39 pm (UTC)
See my comments above on reading Elric;-)

I had a rather awkward introduction to Hardy--he was on the syllabus for my English exams (Certificate of Scottish Sixth Year Studies) and our exchange-program teacher had been misled to how little time we had left to prepare for our exams, which meant reading the power chords in Hardy's oeuvre in quicktime.

For all that I liked Hardy, more so than Dickens (who I read at the same time without appetite), but felt his tone verging on patronising. Again, I may well have a different opinion on him (and Dickens) if were to read him now as a slightly more fully fledged adult;-0
(no subject) - redfiona99 - Dec. 31st, 2008 04:47 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - outerego - Dec. 31st, 2008 07:13 pm (UTC) - Expand
helenze
Dec. 31st, 2008 04:02 pm (UTC)
I absolutely adored Life of Pi and Corrections, but would advise you steer far clear of the dreadful Labyrinth.
ccfinlay
Dec. 31st, 2008 04:13 pm (UTC)
I strongly recommend Primo Levi, any of his books, although Survival in Auschwitz is the place to start. Tadaeuz Borowski's This Way to the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen is another must-read book by a camp survivor, if you feel you must read books about surviving the camps.
gareth_rees
Dec. 31st, 2008 04:36 pm (UTC)
Sense and Sensibility is a delight.

Les Liaisons Dangereuses has a pair of fantastically cruel and utterly cynical villains.

Far from the Madding Crowd is one of my favourite Hardy novels: such a succession of tragedies.

I think the Elric novels still stand up: absurd pulp adventure with an emo sensibility, but so enthusiastic that they achieve a kind of grandeur.

I didn't like the one Ian Rankin novel I tried. Seemed competent but rather dull and unmemorable.
outerego
Dec. 31st, 2008 04:49 pm (UTC)
I thought Fairyland, by Paul McAuley, a cracker of a book. My memory of it puts in the "hard sf but matures well" category (it is thirteen years old, time can be unkind to sf).

I would also recommend Pasquale's Angel by McAuley, a proto-steam punk novel of sixteenth century Florence.

In fact, this has just reminded me to look him up again--he has been publishing chapters of his new book online at http://www.omegacom.demon.co.uk/ .
1trackmind
Dec. 31st, 2008 05:30 pm (UTC)
It looks like we have some of the same unread books on our shelves!

I really disliked The Road and only finished because I was trapped on a plane with nothing else to read. I normally love post-apocalyptic stories but I was not a fan of that one. Part of what irritated me so much was that McCarthy was trying to be clever with language but did it in a way that I found distracting and annoying. Neither of the characters have names, contractions are missing the apostrophe and I seem to recall quotation marks aren't used either.
pigeonhed
Dec. 31st, 2008 08:53 pm (UTC)
I agree about the use of language in The Road. That kind of thing has its place and handled right it works very well, see Riddley walker for instance, but I just couldn't see any reason for the absensce of quotation marks other than he could do it so he did.
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( 49 comments — Leave a comment )

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